Great Ocean Road
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Adventure Park
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Family Activities

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Families

There are loads of things to do and places to see in the region for families. With so much coastline, well serviced towns, villages and regional centres and a hinterland area that has some of the best attractions in Australia, there are activities to suit every type of family, and family member.

Rockpool rambling and beach activities at any number of the beaches in the region are popular. You can learn to surf, boogie board, paddle in the waves or try skim boarding in the shallows. Build sandcastles, play cricket or just enjoy a picnic or ice cream on the sand, the beach is the perfect place for families to spend some time.

As well as Victoria's biggest theme park Adventure Park at Wallington, there are some fantastic attractions suitable for families. The Otway Fly tree top walk is exhilarating, and the dinosaurs hiding in the forest below are popular with kids. There are mini golf courses, a giant maze, loads of playgrounds and places to swim. Pick your own berry farms, animal sanctuaries and a vintage steam train operate in the region, and many of the museums and heritage attractions have specific programs to keep the kids engaged and entertained - learning by stealth.

Sporting activities are also great for families - horse riding tours in the hinterland, bike riding on designated tracks, swimming or water sports, there are places to do all these things and more.

Highlights

Great Ocean Air

Great Ocean Air are the premier air travel service in Victoria. Their luxurious air conditioned Airvans seat seven passengers in spacious cabins with panoramic windows. Choose from a variety of private flight and tours, charter flights, half day scenic tours, day and overnight golf and outback tours and their popular girls day/surfing King Island adventures. Ground transportation, farm stay and beach stay accommodation are available and included in some packages. Make your journey part of the destination. Experience Great Ocean Air. Live the dream.

Adventure Park

Super charge your summer at Victoria's biggest theme park! With awesome family fun all day long, Adventure Park Geelong is home to some of the coolest water rides in Australia. Victoria's hottest and biggest theme park, Adventure Park, located just ten minutes from Geelong boasts exciting rides and attractions, perfect for the whole family! Just some of the ways you can make a gigantic splash and enjoy the unlimited rides all day long include: - Raft the roaring rapids on The River Torrent Lazy River, with twisting tides and swirling gauntlets along a tropical river oasis - Speed down head first and experience the ultimate adrenaline rush of the Six Lane Aqua Racer, a speed slide for the serious thrill-seekers which can take you up to 40km per hour - Race down The Gold Rush Rapids in a speedy 20 seconds and take the two metre plunge - Take a splash in the dark on the Wild West Canyon on a two-seater raft, experiencing twists and 360 degree turns! Adventure Park is doing it for the kids, too! The Tiny Tots Splashzone keeps the young ones cool, safe and entertained, with waterfalls, mini waterslides and spray cannons throughout. While Bonito's Bay Water Play offers a state-of-the-art aquatic playground including waterfalls, water jets and more pirate-filled water fun. On dry land, families can take a ride on the popular Go Karts and Little Buggy Speedway, try a hand at archery, discover the Galactic Games World, challenge family and friends to a game of mini golf, take a leisurely ride on the new Paddle boats and watch the world go by on the classic carousel. Bring in a picnic, hire a barbecue and relax lakeside under shaded picnic areas, marquees and pavilions, set amongst 21 hectares of landscaped parkland.

Fairy Park

Fairy Park is a place dedicated to story telling of fairy tales and ancient myths and legends. A spectacular rocky hilltop has been crafted into a truly unique place where family and friends come to relax and enjoy a day out together in a tranquil environment. Most visitors spend the day but if you are in a hurry allow a couple of hours to get a feel for the place. The three main areas that combine to form Fairy Park are the Fairytale Land, Camelot Playground and the Elephant Rock Picnic Grounds. Suitable for the young and the young at heart, Fairy Park will delight and intrigue all those who make take the journey.

National Wool Museum

The National Wool Museum is housed in a beautifully restored 1872 bluestone wool store close to the vibrant new Waterfront Geelong. The Museum is Australia's largest comprehensive museum of wool, showcasing the region's wool story from the sheep's back to the clothes rack, and from the birth of the industry in the 1840's to its place in the world today. Central to the Museum experience is the 1910 built Axminster Jacquard carpet loom. Daily demonstrations by the Museum's skilled carpet weavers show how the loom works, and at the same time produce the Museum's own Manor House Rug, available for purchase through the Museum Shop. The Museum has two permanent galleries telling the Australian story of wool. The first, The Wool Harvest, looks at sheep farming and wool production. Exploring the pastoral aspect of wool in Australia, visitors can follow the path of the fleece through shearing, classing, wool pressing and dispatch. A recreated shearing shed and a film about shearing demonstrate what life in the shearing industry was like. Shearing demonstrations can be arranged for group bookings. Gallery Two, From Fleece to Fabric, looks at the processing of wool into fabric and offers an insight into the people and processes involved in the textile industry. A sequential display of the machinery actually used in the process demonstrates the transformation of fleece to fabric. The Museum also has an exciting annual calendar of temporary exhibitions and events. On the ground floor, the Museum Shop stocks a wide range of woollen products and unique local crafts while Denny's Kitchen (previously Black Sheep Cafe) offers great food, wines, coffee and cakes. The Museum is fully wheel chair accessible and there are accessible parking spaces located directly in front of the Museum. Bus parking and group tours are also available.

Eastern Beach

The art-deco swimming enclosure at Eastern Beach has been a Geelong favourite for generations. Built in the 1930’s, the ‘Promenade’ is a wooden structure built in an arc, great for walking on a warm evening. The swimming area also has a large tower and diving boards. There is a separate children’s pool that is enclosed and paved. On shore, there is a fantastic adventure playground with plenty of spectator seats for the grown ups. There are large areas of lawn perfect for picnics or, depending on the season, a kick of the football or a game of cricket. There are toilet and dressing room facilities, and the beach is patrolled by lifesavers during summer. There is also a restaurant / café / kiosk on site. The whole area is set amongst grassy hills and enormous trees, and several of the buildings in the precinct are listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.

You Yangs

Rising from the flat, volcanic plains between Geelong and Melbourne, the granite peaks of the You Yangs are a terrific destination for many outdoor activities. Walk to Flinders Peak for panoramic views of Geelong, Corio Bay, the Western Districts and beyond. There are several walking tracks within the park catering for varying abilities. The You Yangs are popular for mountain biking; the two designated mountain bike areas offer 50km of track. The park is also popular for rock climbing, abseiling and horse riding and there are BBQ and picnic areas available, as well as toilets.

Eastern Park

Eastern Park is 185 acres of sporting facilities, walking tracks, parkland and recreation space. Located on the edge of the Geelong CBD and bordering the Geelong Waterfront precinct, it’s a fantastic spot to enjoy fresh air and outdoor activity. The gravel track around the park is used by many locals for jogging, walking and cycling. There are 5 hard wicket cricket ovals as well as pavilions, BBQs and playgrounds, including the award winning Geelong Playspace.

Geelong Botanic Gardens

The Geelong Botanic Gardens are a wonderful mix of old and new featuring traditional heritage gardens as well as the contemporary and waterwise 21st Century garden. The gardens were established in 1851 and as such feature fabulous mature trees, including some rare and exotic. Within the 17 acre space there are rose gardens, shaded lawn areas perfect for picnics, a teahouse. There are also regular guided walks exploring different aspects of the gardens and special interest areas.

Geelong Playspace

The Geelong Playspace is a special playground. Located in the heart of Eastern Park and with views to Corio Bay, the multi-award winning design integrates accessible playground activities into the overall playground. The area caters for children of a wide range of abilities and a great cross section of age groups. The ‘Liberty Swing’ – which provides children in a wheelchair the experience of a playground swing – requires a key, which can be collected from either the National Wool Museum in Moorabool Street or The Carousel on the Waterfront.

Geelong Shopping

As Victoria’s largest regional town, there are loads of shopping options in Geelong. The central city area has a high concentration of malls with major department stores and chains, as well as a good mix of specialty shops and independent boutiques. There are fairly large-scale shopping centres in major suburbs such as Belmont, Waurn Ponds and Corio. Pakington Street, running through Newtown and Geelong West, is vibrant and fashionable. Shops here tend to be independent and perfect for finding on-trend fashion or unique homewares.

Geelong Walking Tours

Start your trip to Geelong with a guided walk where you will visit the key attractions, the arts precinct and our stunning Waterfront. Get some inspiration for the remainder of your stay and even some discounts. Walks depart from the National Wool Museum, Cnr Brougham & Moorabool St. The 2 hour walk costs $12 and includes a delicious morning or afternoon tea hosted by Four Points Sheraton Geelong on the spectacular Waterfront. Bookings are essential - 03 5244 7102.

Geelong Waterfront

Building their city on a North-facing bay was a stroke of genius for the forefathers of Geelong. Generations later, residents and visitors alike are enjoying the benefits of the area collectively known as 'The Waterfront'. Stretching from Eastern Beach around to Rippleside, the area incorporates many restaurants and cafes on the water's edge. There are places for kids to play, from open grassy areas to some of the biggest and best playgrounds in the region. There are kids attractions including the carousel, a miniature train ride and a skate park. Seasonally there are also bungee trampolines and a giant ferris wheel. Childrens attractions, open public space, a lively calendar of events and fabulous places to eat and drink make the Waterfront a Geelong must-do.

Jerringot Wetlands Geelong

Jerringot Wetland is a freshwater marsh within Belmont Common and is part of the Barwon River's natural floodplain. It is a surprising sanctuary for wildlife within an urban setting. Over 120 species of birds visit or live at Jerringot through the year. The internationally significant Latham’s Snipe fly 20,000km from Japan to south eastern Australia and can be found in good numbers during spring and summer. Other significant species include the Australian Shoveler, Hardhead, Baillion’s Crake, Cattle Egret, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper and Great Egret. It is an excellent habitat for frogs, including the endangered Growling Grass Frog. Native fish such as Common and Spotted Galaxias and the rare Australian mudfish find a home in the waters as well as many aquatic plant species. River Red Gum, River Bottlebrush and Teatree, as well as thickets of Tangled Lignum fringe the river side of the wetland.

Johnstone Park

Located on the Western edge of the city centre and adjacent to the Geelong Railway Station, Johnstone Park is a glorious green space, with mature trees, grassed lawn areas and a heritage bandstand. The Little Malop Street edge of the park is an arts and culture precinct within Geelong and home to the Geelong Gallery, Geelong Regional Library, Geelong Performing Arts Centre, and the Geelong Heritage Centre.

Kardinia Park

Just South of the Geelong CBD, Kardinia Park is most famous for its AFL Champion tenants, the Geelong Cats. Simonds Stadium, the Geelong Football Club home ground, is on the Eastern side of Kardinia Park. The stadium seats 28,300 people and hosts AFL matches during winter and a range of other sporting events at other times during the year. Kardinia Park is also home to Kardinia Swimming Pool, which operates with seasonal hours between October and April. With two Olympic sized swimming pools, several childrens’ pools, two diving boards (1m and 3m) and a waterslide. Also within the bounds of the park are a childrens’ playground, fitness circuit, cricket and football ovals, netball courts and walking / running / riding tracks.

Ocean Grove Beach

Ocean Grove Beach is located in the centre of the 9.5 km long beach that curves in a broad, south facing arc from Point Lonsdale to the Barwon River mouth. The Ocean Grove section is 2 km long and faces south-east. Some protection is offered by Barwon Heads and the beach receives waves averaging 1.4m. These waves interact with the fine beach sand to produce a wide, low gradient beach face, fronted by a 300m wide surf zone that contains strong rips every 250m. During moderate waves, the rips increase in size and intensity toward Collendina, while decreasing toward Barwon Heads. At low tide, the beach and exposed bar can be over 100 m wide, with the deeper rip channels clearly visible. The town of Ocean Grove backs the beach, with a wide, well-arranged foreshore reserve between the town and the beach. It provides extensive parking, together with most beach amenities. The good parking and easy access, together with the surf club patrols and slightly lower waves make this a popular summer beach. The Ocean Grove Surf Life Saving Club was formed in 1948 and performs an average of 8 rescues each year. Swimming A moderately safe beach, particularly during average summer conditions, when extensive bars dominate. Best at high tide, however watch the rips, particularly at low tide. Best to stay between the flags. Surfing Usually has wide, moderate to low beach breaks; more popular with summer surfers. Fishing Best to go up the beach away from the summer crowds, and where rip holes are more common. General A popular summer beach, which can hold a large crowd. It has a wide, shallow surf zone with rips increasing up the beach, so it is best to stay near the surf club and bathe in the patrolled area. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Pakington Street

Pakington Street (or ‘Pako’ to locals) is a vibrant, cosmopolitan mix of shopping and eating out. Food and drink ranges from casual coffee shops with al fresco facilities and pubs with bistros to trendy bars and top class restaurants. Fashion stores, boutique giftware, specialty stores and gourmet groceries make up the eclectic mix of shops. You are likely to finish your day with a killer pair of heels and a bag of locally grown gourmet tomatoes.

Rippleside

The Rippleside foreshore reserve in Geelong’s Northern suburbs is best known as the home of the Geelong Community Adventure Playground. The wooden playground offers a great range of equipment for children of all ages and abilities. There are also public toilets, picnic and BBQ facilities at the park, as well as a great expanse of grassed area perfect for ball sports, kites or just a run-around.

Old Geelong Gaol

The Old Geelong Gaol museum has a great variety of displays that tell the history of the gaol and visitors get hands on experience of the harsh conditions prisoners and staff endured at the facility Open from 1pm - 4pm Saturdays, Sundays, school and public holidays, Visitors can experience solitary confinement cells, get a taste of prison life, meet some infamous figures who have spent time at the gaol and see the original hallows.

Saddle On Riding School

Saddle On Horse Riding School is situated 15 kilometres north east of the Geelong city centre. At Saddle On Riding School facilities include an indoor riding arena, three outdoor arenas, lunging arena, cross country and jumping course, undercover horse bays and more. Whilst the locals enjoy riding lessons and celebrating birthday parties, visitors are welcome to visit the animal nursery and feed the animals for a small fee, or have a led pony ride on Tuesday till Fridays between 10.00am and 2.00pm. For people wanting to settle in the Geelong Region or close proximity, Saddle On Riding School is a Registered Training Organisation offering accredited equine courses of study. These include: stable hand course, assistant instructor and instructor or coach courses. Canteen facilities and clubrooms are available for all to enjoy. Bookings can be made for riding lessons, led pony rides, animal petting and birthday parties. Birthday parties can include pony, BMX, archery, animal, Cart Ride, Jumping Castle or any combination. Please view their website for information. School holiday day programs are also available for horse riding enthusiasts. For further information please contact Saddle On Riding School or visit their website.

The Carousel

The Carousel is an Armitage-Herschell portable steam driven, hand-carved wooden carousel was constructed circa 1892 and is one of only 200 in operation around the world. Featuring 36 Dare horses and two chariots, it was purchased by the Steampacket Place Development Board in 1996 and painstakingly restored. There is also a replica 1898 Gavioli Band organ in the pavilion. The Carousel has become an ideal accessible meeting place for the community, and the owners take pride in providing a memorable experience for all ages and abilities. This has been made possible with improved access to the pavilion, the welcome installation of a mobility lift and recharge point. The mobility lift enables a wheelchair to go on the Carousel ride and was specially designed to respect and complement the history of the Carousel. As well as being a Tourist Attraction and meeting place, The Carousel also offers a wide range of services including: Children's Birthday Parties, Wedding Ceremonies and Receptions, Photo Shoots and Corporate Functions.

jirrahlinga-koala-wildlife-sanctuary

The Jirrahlinga Koala & Wildlife Sanctuary is situated on five acres of land on the Northern edge of Barwon Heads. Jirrahlinga, Aboriginal for 'Seek a home for a kangaroo', was established more than 30 years ago by Tehree Gordon to be a haven for injured wildlife. Following the Ash Wednesday Bush fires in 1983, Jirrahlinga received national and international media coverage acclaiming the rescue mission launched to seek out and treat shocked and burnt animals. However, Jirrahlinga is not just for distressed native animals, it is primarily about people. Particularly people who have a disability, a special need, the frail or the aged. What better therapy could there be than to come into a supportive environment to work quietly with animals or just visit and touch a koala or joey that do not place demands on a person's physical or mental capacities.

Moorabool Valley Chocolate

Moorabool Valley Chocolate is a small family-owned business. The chocolates are carefully hand-made in the new chocolate kitchen attached to an 80-year-old farmhouse on the outskirts of Geelong. Moorabool Valley Chocolate use fresh ingredients and natural flavourings, locally sourced whenever possible. They are always experimenting with new flavours and combinations to add to the product range, which means that the range is constantly changing. Moorabool Valley Chocolate make truffles, pralines, fruit and nut clusters, chocolate bars and novelty items. They respond to consumers' needs and will do the best to create the chocolate you want. Most of the chocolates have no preservatives, so it is recommended that you store them in a cool place and consume them as soon as possible. The owner and chocolatier, Lynne Meek, was awarded second prize, Hand-Made Chocolates, Royal Melbourne Show 2006.

Combat Laser Strike Geelong

Laser Strike is a safe and exciting outdoor laser skirmish, laser tag based in The Basin, Gembrook, Geelong, Warrnambool, Mansfield-Benalla, Phillip Island, Mt Buller and Mobile! The laser skirmish guns shoot harmless beams of infra-red light, they work both indoors and outdoors, make lots of noise and have sensors on the target lighting up to show a 'hit'. Each hit reduces available health points, until the player gets "killed or retired" from the game. There are several different weapons on offer including short-range sub-machine guns through to long-range telescopic sniper rifles, each with its own tactics and uses. Many different tactical missions and scenarios are battled out and are to be won or lost. Teams must work together on their planning and strategy to achieve their aims and objectives. Games and sessions available both during the day and at night. Laser Strike and it's combat simulation is just like paintball but without the pain or the bruises and is great for birthday parties, sports teams, corporate team building events, school and university groups, social clubs and groups, hens and bucks parties and individuals Laser Strike is also 100% fully mobile. Yes, Combat Laser Strike can come to you! Best of all ----ANY AGE CAN PLAY!

Balyang Sanctuary Geelong

A haven for waterbirds and popular with picnicking families, Balyang Sanctuary is situated in Geelong suburb Newtown. The centrepiece of the nine hectare park is a lake with three islands – two connected by bridges and the third retained as a safe nesting place for native birds. Feathered residents at the sanctuary include swans, pelicans, Eurasian coot, dusky moorhen, Pacific black duck, mallard, pied cormorant, geese and silver gulls There are also shady grassed areas, picnic areas, a rotunda, free parking and public toilet facilities.

Barwon River

From its beginnings in the Otway Ranges, the Barwon River winds its way through suburban Geelong before flowing into the ocean at Barwon Heads. The mouth of the river has sandy banks that are popular with walkers and families having a paddle or building sandcastles. Fishing is popular on the jetties near the mouth of the river and kayakers and paddlers are often seen in this area. Barwon Heads has a sailing club where laser yachts are often seen at high tide. There are also BBQs and picnic areas alongside the riverbank.

Barwon River Geelong

From its beginnings in the Otway Ranges, the Barwon River winds its way through suburban Geelong before flowing into the ocean at Barwon Heads. The Barwon River is the site for a huge number of leisure pursuits for Geelong residents. There are several rowing clubs located in Belmont, and a little further south there is an area for waterskiing. At various points along the river as it runs through Geelong there are tracks for running, cycling and walking. There are also several parks, playgrounds, picnic spots and BBQ areas. The mouth of the river has sandy banks that are well used walkers and families who build sandcastles and paddle in the shallows. Fishing is popular on the jetties near the mouth of the river and kayakers and paddlers are often seen in this area. Barwon Heads also has a sailing club where laser yachts are often seen at high tide. There are also BBQs and picnic areas alongside the riverbank.

Bellarine Rail Trail

The Bellarine Rail Trail is a disused railway corridor has been reborn as a 32km walking/cycling path linking the outskirts of Geelong with the coast at the historic village of Queenscliff. The Bellarine Rail Trail mostly follows the reserve of the old Geelong-Queenscliff railway, established in 1879 to service the military fort at Queenscliff. The railway soon became a popular service with visitors heading to the coastal holiday resort, an alternative to the bay paddle steamers. Eventually, diminishing freight and a lack of patronage saw the service finally closed in 1976. The rail trail begins near the Geelong Showgrounds, about one kilometre from the South Geelong railway station and ends near the historic Queenscliff railway station. It is mainly flat, with some short, steep climbs up from Leopold toward Curlewis and Drysdale. Steam trains still run on the section between Queenscliff and Drysdale. The Bellarine Peninsula Railway's vintage trains carry passengers on Sundays and public holidays. There are many access points to the trail and bay scenery and birdlife are some of the highlights. In the future, it is planned to link the trail with the Barwon River trail network and Eastern Park.

Baywalk Bollards

104 bollards line the arc of Waterfront Geelong from Limeburners Point to Rippleside. Artist Jan Mitchell transformed the old timber pier pylons into this colourful piece of public art. Each bollard represents a different character from Geelong's history, from the Wauthaurong and together they tell a fascinating story. Further information and a booklet is available at local Visitor Information Centres.

Bellarine Adventure Golf

You may have played mini golf or putt putt before but never like this, Bellarine Adventure Golf takes mini golf to another level. Set amongst beautiful gardens complete with creeks and waterfalls, the 36 ingeniously crafted holes will keep players of all ages both entertained and challenged. Multi-level greens, balls that seem to defy the laws of gravity, tricky water hazards and sticky sand traps ensure that everyone's games certainly will be an adventure in which both luck and skill play a part! There are two 18 hole courses to choose from: the Mill offers a great, fun course with plenty of shelter making it playable even if the weather isn't the best, while the Mountain course offers a bit more of a challenge for those wanting to really test their skills. Or play both courses, taking advantage of the generous discounts on second rounds. Bellarine Adventure Golf have a café that offers great locally roasted coffee from Geelong's own Capra Coffee and a great selection of snacks and cookies to enjoy along with it. Groups, clubs and schools love the function room and barbecue facilities plus the delicious catering that is available. Kids' birthday parties are also a specialty. Check Bellarine Adventure Golf's Facebook page for regular special offers or contact them for further information.

Point Addis Marine National Park

The Point Addis Marine National Park features spectacular scenery with wide sandy beaches, crumbling limestone and sandstone cliffs, rocky platforms and copious small rocky reefs. The coastline is exposed to intense wave action from the southern ocean, a major contributor to the shaping of this rugged coastline. Visitors exploring the marine environment within this park may enjoy exploring the limestone reefs with abundant rockpools filled with marine life. The subtidal waters are recognised as supporting a wide range of fish and algae species as well as seals, dolphins, brilliantly coloured sponge gardens and extensive rhodolith beds. Offshore, and often difficult to access due to tides and swell, Ingoldsby Reef is a particularly popular destination for divers to explore and search for such creatures. Aboriginal Traditional Owners Parks Victoria acknowledges the Aboriginal Traditional Owners of Victoria - including its parks and reserves. Through their cultural traditions, Aboriginal people maintain their connection to their ancestral lands and waters. Indigenous tradition indicates that this park is part of the Country of the Wathaurong people and that Indigenous people have a long association with this region. Before you go Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Learn to Surf

What better place to learn to surf than in the birthplace of Australian surfing? There are several licensed tour operators and qualified instructors who run learn to surf classes on beaches close to Torquay. Catering for individuals or groups, often equipment hire and transport can be included in the price.

Surf World Museum

The Surf World Museum in Torquay, Australia’s surfing capital, celebrates the story of surfing. It also charts Australia’s significant contribution to the development of surfing around the world. Through the colourful and exciting permanent displays and temporary exhibitions of important surfing artefacts and memorabilia, the museum commemorates Australia’s fantastic surfing heritage and rich beach culture. An unforgettable experience, Surf World provides the opportunity to immerse yourself in one of Australia’s most popular pastimes. It’s a place where you can experience or relive, surfing’s sense of fun, and marvel at the changes that have taken place over the years. We look forward to welcoming you.

The Surf Coast Walk

Whether you're a nature lover or a fun lover, whether you take an hour, a day or a week, the Surf Coast Walk puts a stunning and unique coastal environment within easy reach. - Offering natural beauty and easy access - A world-class walking destination for all to enjoy - On the edge of the stunning Great Ocean Road - Do a section or do it all; at your own pace - More than a walk, over half the track is suitable for bikes Relish the rich ochre of the Bells Beach cliffs, the deep blue of Bass Strait and the leafy green of eucalypt forects. Discover traditional Wathaurung country, fascinating surf culture and abundant wildlife as the walk connects you with the coastal town comforts of Torquay, Anglesea and Aireys Inlet.

Sundial of Human Involvement

Picturesquely located on the foreshore land at Fishermans Beach at the corner of Darian Road and The Esplanade, the sundial was assembled in the traditional and time-honoured method of mosaic and comprises more than 120,000 glass Tesserae tiles. The sundial represents the traditional dreaming stories of the indigenous Wathaurong people. Your body becomes the ‘dial’ on this unique piece of art. Stand in the centre of the design and you can tell the time by the shadow cast by your body.

Cycle Torquay

Cycling is a great way to explore the gorgeous coastal and hinterland scenery around Torquay. There are terrific road rides for serious and recreational riders, as well as off road trails to suit mountain bikers or family groups.

Torquay Fishermans Beach

Fishermans Beach, as the name suggests, is a low energy beach traditionally used to launch fishing boats. This is still true today with a boat ramp on the beach, as well as sailing, yacht, and motor boat clubs all located behind the western end of the beach. The beach lies in Zeally Bay and runs south-west for 1 km from the mouth of the small Deep Creek, then south to the 10 m high limestone bluffs at Yellow Bluff. The entire beach is backed by a foreshore reserve and The Esplanade. It has parking areas and other facilities. Swimming A relatively safe beach with a wide, shallow bar and usually no rips. Stay clear of the boating activity near the ramp and boat clubs. Surfing Usually a low shorebreak. Big winter swells do however break over the shallow reefs and bars to produce reasonable waves, when everything else is closed out. Fishing Best off Yellow Bluff at high tide where you can reach the reef. At low tide, shallow water and exposed reefs dominate. General This is Torquay's most protected beach and is very popular in summer with those who are looking for quieter surf conditions. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Front Beach

Torquay's Front Beach fronts the town centre. It is a well-appointed beach with a well-maintained foreshore reserve between The Esplanade and the beach. There are numerous facilities in the reserve, including a tourist information centre. A seawall and a row of tall Norfolk Island pines back the beach, and several wooden groynes cross the beach. The beach faces due east and runs for 1 km from Yellow Bluff to Point Danger. The point and its reefs protect the beach, which receives waves averaging less than 1 m. These maintain a shallow, continuous, attached bar. Swimming This is Torquay's most popular family beach, with usually low waves, a shallow bar and no rips, plus the added safety of a summer lifeguard patrol. Surfing Usually a low beach break used by learners. During big swell, waves can make it around Point Danger to break as right handers off Front Beach. Fishing The best location is on Point Danger. However, watch the waves and tides, as it is awash at high tide. General Torquay's showpiece beach with good access, facilities, a lifeguard and usually low, safe surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Surf (Back) Beach

Torquay is the 'Surfing Capital of Australia'. Torquay Beach was the site of the first malibu board demonstration in Australia, back in 1956. Today Torquay is more important for being the closest town to the famous Bells Beach, and the stepping-off point for a number of surfing locations along the Great Ocean Road. The Torquay Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1945, has also hosted state, national and international surf lifesaving carnivals. More recently, a number of major surfing companies and an excellent Surf World exhibition have been located at Torquay's Surf Coast Plaza. Torquay Beach is 800 m long and faces south-east, with some protection provided toward the southern end by Rocky Point. Extensive intertidal rock reefs lie off Point Danger at the northern end, and Spring Creek drains across the beach just west of the surf club. Waves average 1.2 m and usually cut three rips across the single bar, with additional permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The southern rip, known as the ‘Escalator’ is particularly strong during easterly conditions. The beach itself is moderately steep and is backed by extensive parking areas, particularly along the eastern half. Swimming A very popular summer beach bolstered by its name, good accessibility and surf lifesaving club. The beach is moderately safe on the bars in the patrolled areas, however avoid the rocks and strong rips, particularly toward Point Danger as, on average, 27 people are rescued here each year. Surfing The site of the first short board riding in Australia and still a very popular, if crowded, location year round. The beach offers a wide beach break, which is moderately protected during westerlies, though best in a north-westerly, with a left hander off Point Danger. Fishing Both beach and rock fishing are available, with the best rip holes toward the northern end. Take care on the rocks, as they are awash at high tide. General One of Victoria's best known and most popular summer surfing beaches. The adjacent town offers all facilities, while the patrolled beach is popular with bathers and surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 300 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Swim Torquay

Although Torquay is known for its pounding surf, there are also some great spots sheltered from the swell that are terrific for families and swimming. Cosy Corner is between Torquay front beach and the rocks at Point Danger and Fishermans Beach is between Whites Beach and Zeally Bay.

Torquay Walking Trails

There are several designated walking trails offering a different perspective on Torquay. The foreshore trail, beginning at Deep Creek Reserve on the Esplanade, takes in spectacular coastal views, children’s playgrounds and public art. The Surf Coast walk is a 30km long marked trail and individual sections can be completed depending on energy levels. It begins at Jan Juc and passes through Bells Beach, Point Addis, Anglesea, Aireys Inlet, Fairhaven and Torquay. A complete guide is available from the Torquay Visitor Information Centre. The Deep Creek Reserve is a strip of land extending along the watercourse between the Surf Coast Highway and The Esplanade. It is the last remnant of Torquay’s indigenous vegetation and there are walking tracks throughout the reserve.

Torquay Whites Beach

Point Impossible is a low, calcarenite point, capped by 10 m high foredunes and bordered by the mouth of Thompson Creek. The gravel road from Torquay runs out to the point, where there is a large car park. A small beach (Point Impossible Beach) lies in front of the car park and forms the western boundary of Thompson Creek. A foreshore reserve and the road back the 4.5 km long Whites Beach, with car parks and access tracks across the dune. The eastern section of the beach, just back from the point, is an official Optional Dress (nude) Beach. The beach faces south-east and is protected to the south by Point Danger, and along the central-eastern section by extensive rock reefs. As a result, waves average 1 m at the beach and usually produce a continuous, shallow bar only cut by rips during and following high seas. Swimming The small Point Impossible Beach varies with wave and tide conditions. Take care if swimming here and watch the deeper tidal channel and currents. Whites Beach is a moderately safe beach close inshore, in lee of the reefs. Watch for rips during higher waves, particularly near the reefs and rocks. Surfing Usually low shorebreaks along the beach. However during big winter swell, many surfers head for Point Impossible, where there are two breaks. These are Insides against the car park and creek, when waves are up to 1.5 m; and Outsides on the outer reef, when waves are higher. Fishing The point and creek mouth are the most popular spots, with the beach tending to be shallow. General A natural beach next to the popular town of Torquay, used by those who want to get away from the more crowded (and clothed) town beaches. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.
Avalon Raceway
Near Anakie

Avalon Raceway

Avalon Raceway first opened in the summer of 1976 which saw the dream of brothers Doug and Norm Drew come true. Both had been active drivers around the region and with the closure of Torquay Speedway saw the Drew Family build the Speedway on the land in Old Melbourne Road, Lara. Since that time the family have strived to improve the venue and along the way have created a number of Blue Ribbon Events that are nationally recognised. The early years saw Solo and Sidecars as the major drawcard attracting world champions Ole Olsen, Barry Biggs, Ivan Mauger, along with touring English Lions teams and European champions battle with legendary Phil Crump, while the sidecar action was nothing short of incredible with an Australian Championship and numerous Victorian Titles contested with the introduction of more clay content in the early 90's saw the demise of bike racing and the emergence of Sprintcar Racing which today Avalon Raceway holds a number of events which are highly rated on the national scene. These include the newly created Invitational Jackpot, the Presidents Cup, World Series Sprintcars and Round One of the Easter Trail. Avalon also hosts major events for its other classes as well. The K Rock Cup a major Super Sedan Show, West Coast Classic, Victoria's longest running Modified Production Feature plus major events for V8 Dirt Modifieds, Street Stocks, Speedcars and AMCA'.

Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary

Located near the mouth of Barwon River, Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary protects 17ha of predominately composed of reef. The eastern half of the reef is basalt, formed from lava flow, and is exposed to the flow of the river. The western side is old sandstone and influenced by ocean swell. On the outer edges of the reef are the wrecks of two ships. The variation in conditions across the reef results in the presence of a huge diversity of plants and animals. Visitors can see anything from feather stars and barnacles to rock lobsters, rays and schools of fish. Bull Kelp, sandstone arches and sponge gardens create a fascinating and complex underwater world. Before you go Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Ocean Grove - Collendina Beach

Collendina Beach occupies most of the open bay between Point Lonsdale and Barwon Heads. It is 6 km long, extending from the reefs west of Point Lonsdale Beach to 1 km west of the Collendina Beach car park. The only public access is at the car park, together with tracks over the foredune from the caravan park. The beach faces south-south-east and for the most part is backed by 10 to 20 m high, vegetated dunes, with a few blowouts. It receives waves averaging between 1 and 1.5 m, which break over a wide, low gradient surf zone and occasional reefs and rocks. Persistent rips occur every 250 m, with some permanent rips against the more prominent reefs. During bigger seas, waves break on outer, deeper reefs. Swimming Be careful on this beach as there are usually deep rip holes and strong currents along the beach. Stay inshore on the attached section of the bars and well clear of the rips and reefs. Surfing There are many beach and a few reef breaks along the beach, with best conditions in a low to moderate swell and northerly winds. Fishing There are excellent persistent rip holes and occasional gutters along the beach, plus some occasional reefs. General A long relatively natural beach offering plenty of sand, a low gradient inner surf for bathing, rip holes for fishing and numerous beach breaks for surfing. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Ocean Grove Nature Reserve

The Ocean Grove Nature Reserve is the only preserved native woodland on the Bellarine Peninsula. Home to 178 species of native plants, including 22 orchids, the reserve is an important tract of land. Wildlife within the reserve includes wallabies, echidnas, possums and koalas. There are also snakes and lizards, as well as some 167 species of bird recorded as being spotted within the reserve.

Point Lonsdale Beach

Point Lonsdale forms the western side of Port Phillip Heads, with The Rip separating it from Point Nepean. The town of Point Lonsdale has a protected bay beach and more exposed ocean beaches. The main ocean beach is known as the Surf or Back Beach and is the site of Point Lonsdale Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1947. A walking track leads from the surf club over the dunes to the beach. Surf Beach extends for 900 m from a wide, intertidal rock platform, located just east of the surf lifesaving club, to where more rocks and reefs outcrop in the surf. In fact, low tide rock flats dominate this beach and are clearly visible at low tide. The beach faces south-west and receives waves averaging 1.4 m, which produce a single attached bar, cut by strong rips every 250 m. In addition, strong permanent rips run out against some of the reefs, the worst being The Escalator to the left of the club house. These rips have been responsible for many rescues, with an average of 30 each year. There have also been drownings at the beach, so be very wary and stay between the flags. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach owing to the moderate waves and strong permanent and shifting rips, together with rocks and reefs. Definitely stay on the bars, clear of the rips and rocks and between the flags. Surfing Beach breaks are common over the numerous reefs, with the best known as Glaneuses, located at the end of Glaneuse Road, and adjacent to The Escalator rip. It offers a good left over the reef. Surfing is best with northerly winds, a low to moderate swell at mid to high tide, as the reefs are exposed at low tide. Fishing A popular spot offering permanent rips and gutters, particularly adjacent to the reefs and rocks. General This is the surf beach for the popular Point Lonsdale holiday town and very popular with bathers in summer and surfers year round. However it is a hazardous beach with strong permanent rips, so use extreme care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 8 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Point Lonsdale Lighthouse

The Point Lonsdale Lighthouse is on the Western side of Port Phillip Heads overlooking the Rip and all seaborne traffic bound for Melbourne passes by it. Whilst signals have operated on this point since 1852, the current concrete towers was built in 1902. The lighthouse precinct, including nearby military defence structure, is registered with Heritage Victoria. The area around the base of the lighthouse is accessible to the public and tours of the interior are conducted by the Queenscliff Maritime Museum most Sundays and at various holiday times throughout the year.

Point Lonsdale Playground

Adjacent to the front beach in Point Lonsdale is a fantastic adventure playground for kids of all ages. The park is well shaded and has toilets, BBQ, seating and parking nearby.

Boating in Portarlington

There are several places to launch a boat in Portarlington and surrounding areas. The Point Richards boat ramp, just west of town, has just been upgraded. It is now a safer facility with two lanes, able to take larger scale boats and is close to King George Whiting and snapper grounds. Other nearby boat ramps include those at St Leonards, Indented Head and Clifton Springs.

Rockpool Ramble at Point Lonsdale

At low tide the sandstone platform just below the lighthouse in the Point Lonsdale Marine Reserve is the perfect place to explore the rockpools. The water is crystal clear and an amazing range of marine wildlife and plants are visible. There are also reefs just offshore that are ideal for divers and snorkelers.

point-danger-marine-sanctuary

Located in Torquay, one of Victoria's favourite seaside towns, the reef is ideal for snorkelling and exploring the diverse marine life at low tide. The area between Torquay's back and front beaches is formed of beds of crumbling limestone and a narrow rock platform which extends to the west. A small reef which is only exposed at the lowest of summer tides lies just offshore and is often isolated from the beach by a deep sandy channel. One shipwreck is found within the park, the Joseph H. Scammell. The limestone reef is an enthralling feature of this park. Covered in small boulders and intricate seaweed beds, the reef is home to a number of weird and wonderful creatures. Most noteworthy is the huge diversity of seaslugs, currently 96 species known to occur in this sanctuary, many of which are endemic. These fascinating creatures can be any colour of the rainbow and come in a range of exquisite shapes and sizes. Also present are carnivorous worms, delicate brittle stars and majestic eagle rays. See if you can spot a Fairy Tern, a rare and endangered bird which uses habitats in Point Danger Marine Sanctuary for feeding and roosting. Before you go, note that conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Portarlington Miniature Railway

The Portarlington Miniature Railway is located in the Rotary Children's Park at the northern (bay) end of Point Richards Road, Portarlington. It is open every first and third Sunday of the month as well as every other Sunday from November to April. The Rotary Children's Park as well as containing the Miniature railway also has free undercover barbecue's, rotunda's, a children's playground, ample parking for cars and buses, children's jumping castle (weather permitting) and large grassed area suitable for picnics and play areas. It is situated adjacent to a boat ramp and the beach. The Miniature railway is available for private hire, birthday parties, school break-ups, end of year functions, wedding and corporate hire at any time other then normal running times, see website for more information.

Golden Plains Farmers Market

Come and taste the real food and produce from the farms and vineyards of Golden Plains and Moorabool Valley. Fresh from the farm, sold by the farmers. The award winning Golden Plains Farmers’ Market is authentic and accredited, held in the heart of Bannockburn just 20 minutes from Geelong. Held on the first Saturday, every month, every season, from 9am to 1pm—you can start at the farmers’ market then spend the day touring Golden Plains.
Bancoora Beach
Near Torquay

Bancoora Beach

Bancoora Beach is a 1 km long, south-east facing beach located between low, basaltic, rocky points and reefs, and backed by a natural, vegetated foredune. The Bancoora Surf Life Saving Club and car park are located behind the foredune, leaving the beach in an attractive natural state. The beach receives waves averaging 1.3 m, which usually cut three rips across the 80 m wide single bar and surf zone. Higher waves intensify the rips, with strong permanent rips running out against the rocks at each end. On average, 10 people are rescued here each year. Swimming An attractive, moderately safe, patrolled beach, particularly during lower summer swell. Stay on the bars in the patrolled area, and avoid the strong rips near the rocks. Surfing Usually a low to moderate beach break, with a right hand point break out on the southern point during higher swell. Fishing Popular in summer with the campers. Offers both beach fishing with some rip holes and rock fishing off the points. General An out of the way, relatively natural beach, more popular in summer when the nearby caravan park is full and the beach is patrolled. It is only used by surfers in winter. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Beaches near Barwon Heads

At Barwon Heads, the coast trends due west for 7 km to Black Rocks. The first 2 km are dominated by calcarenite rocks and reefs, which outcrop on the beach and in the surf. These divide the coast into three beaches. The first (285) is below Point Finders and is a 50 m pocket of sand facing south-east and bordered by rock platforms and reefs. The two Barwon Heads beaches (286, 287) face south and are more exposed, with higher waves and patchy reefs. These conditions result in a wide, low gradient beach, rock flat and surf, with persistent and some permanent rips against the reefs. All three beaches are easily accessible. There is a car park and a lookout on Point Flinders, and car parks on the Torquay Road, which parallels the two Barwon Heads beaches. Swimming Point Flinders is relatively safe close inshore, however there are rocks and reefs off the beach. The Barwon Heads beaches are both potentially hazardous, owing to the higher waves, reefs and strong permanent rips. Surfing There are several breaks along this section, mostly reef breaks that work best at higher tide, with a low to moderate swell and north winds. Those immediately west of Point Flinders are called The Hole. Fishing There are excellent rip holes and gutters next to the reefs, together with rocks and reefs to fish from at low tide. General A reef dominated section of coast, most suitable for beach fishing and experienced surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Barwon Heads Bluff

The tidal flows at the mouth of the Barwon River have created an amazing landscape at the Barwon Heads Bluff. It is one of the best spots in the region to observe marine life in rockpools. More than 90% of the creatures found at the Bluff are only found in Southern Australia and nowhere else in the world. The Bluff has an enormous diversity of seaweeds from tiny encrusting pink coralline algae to mighty forests of giant and bull kelps. There are many different species of fish, snails, seastars, and other invertebrates that all make the Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary their home. The high lookout at the bluff has views towards Port Phillip Heads to the east and along the Surf Coast to the West.

Thirteenth Beach Barwon Heads

Thirteenth Beach is part of the 7 km long section of coast between Barwon Heads and Black Rock. It occupies the western 4.5 km and faces essentially due south. The beach receives waves averaging 1.5 m, is moderately sloping and is fronted by a single bar, dominated by rips every 250 m. The beach is backed by a vegetated foredune for most of its length, and the Barwon Heads to Torquay Road. The best access is provided at the surf lifesaving club, with additional car parks and access tracks located along the road. The surf club, founded in 1961, is the only development on what is a relatively natural beach. Its members rescue 5 people on average each year. Swimming Rips are a common feature of the beach, with safest bathing on the bars in the patrolled area. Strong permanent rips lie east of the surf club. The western end is adjacent to the Black Rock sewer outlet and should be avoided. Surfing A popular surfing beach with low to moderate swell providing numerous beach breaks, all readily accessible from the main road. One of the more popular areas is in front of the shipping beacon, known as The Beacon. Best with northerly winds. Fishing A good, natural spot for beach fishing, with good road access to the numerous rip holes that persist along the beach. General A relatively undeveloped beach, more popular with surfers and bathers who want a patrolled beach away from the crowds. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Breamlea

Breamlea is a small holiday settlement lying between the banks of Thompson Creek and Breamlea Beach. The beach faces south-south-east and runs for 2 km from the low basalt rocks at Noble Rocks to the mouth of the creek at Point Impossible. There is road access to the back of the fore dunes, with foot tracks crossing the 20 m high fore dune to reach the beach. The beach receives waves averaging just over 1 m, which usually produce an attached bar cut by rips every 250 m. At the creek mouth, both a tidal channel and shoals are present. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach, owing to the persistent rips and creek mouth. Stay on the attached section of the bars and clear of the rips, rocks and creek. Surfing Usually low to moderate beach breaks along the length of the beach. Fishing This beach has rocks at one end, the creek at the other and usually rip holes and gutters along the beach. General A natural beach, mainly used by the Breamlea locals for bathing, surfing and fishing. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Bellarine Railway

The railway hugs the water around scenic Swan Bay providing breathtaking views, before climbing through the rolling hills of the Bellarine Peninsula between Queenscliff and Drysdale. Trains operate on Sundays and additional days during Summer and school holiday periods. Visit www.bpr.org.au for further timetable information, news and events.

Jan Juc Beach

Jan Juc Beach is located immediately south of Torquay and is a little more exposed, receiving waves averaging 1.4 m. It extends for 1.2 km between Rocky Point and Bird Rock and faces almost due south, resulting in larger waves. The waves combine with the fine to medium sand to produce a single bar cut by three to four rips, with permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The northern half of the beach is backed by low bluffs, partly covered by dunes. The surf lifesaving club, parking and access, together with Jan Juc Creek, are in the centre, while the narrow, southern half of the beach is backed by 20 m high cliffs. The Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club was founded in 1963 and annually rescues an average of 30 people. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, owing to the high waves and persistent rips. More suitable for experienced bathers and surfers. Stay between the flags and away from the rips and rocks. Surfing Usually variable beach breaks, however Bird Rock can provide excellent rights with a moderate swell and high tide. Fishing Best toward the northern end where rip holes are more persistent. General Jan Juc is Torquay's second and more exposed surfing beach. Still popular in summer for those escaping the Torquay crowds, however the variable beach and surf conditions warrant extra care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

SEAROAD FERRIES QUEENSCLIFF

Searoad Ferries connects the Great Ocean Road and the Bellarine to the Mornington Peninsula, the 40 minute crossing is a stress free alternative to driving through the city. Two specially designed all weather 60 metre ferries have easy drive on/drive off facilities, spacious comfortable lounges with full-length windows, a tempting cafe and plenty of deck space. Watch out for dolphins, whales in winter and enormous ships as you breathe incredibly fresh air. Arriving at Sorrento, you will have a perfect view of multi-million dollar mansions sitting atop cliffs, tiny coves filled with boats, the beautiful foreshore and old limestone buildings. Whether you are going home or on a journey far away, there's no better way to see the bay than with Searoad Ferries. Passengers with vehicles are advised to arrive at the terminals at least 20 minutes prior to departure. The ferries depart from Queenscliff Harbour, Queenscliff and the Sorrento Pier, Sorrento. Special Features on the 40 minute journey are the unparalleled views of historic lighthouses, the Point Nepean fortifications, navigational features, seals and dolphins are available from the comfortable lounge areas, cafe style seating or numerous observation decks. Both vessels are fully equipped to cater for passengers with disabilities, including an internal lift from the vehicle deck to the passenger lounge. Coaches may be booked ahead. Seven days notice is advisable to secure passage.

Great Ocean Road Memorial Archway

Built as a tribute to the soldiers from the First World War who were engaged in the construction of the Great Ocean Road, the memorial arch provides a great photographic opportunity for travellers entering Lorne. Alongside the arch is a sculpture also commemorating the returned servicemen, which was commissioned and placed during the 75th anniversary of the road celebrations. There is a carpark alongside this area so visitors can make the most of this photo opportuniy.

Bellarine Railway

The Bellarine Railway is a volunteer operated organisation located on the Bellarine Peninsula, offering heritage train rides and experiences between Queenscliff and Drysdale, on board a collection of steam and diesel trains originating from around Australia. The heritage service is available on Sundays, most public holidays, as well as Tuesdays and Thursdays during the school holidays. Extra running days are available of the summer holidays. Carriage hire is available as part of the heritage service and perfect for children's parties or groups looking for the benefits of private train hire without the added cost. Experiences and special events offered are Steam and Diesel Train Driver Experiences, a Day out with Thomas weekends, Special occasion and wedding charters, Mid-week steam and diesel trips, Tailored group and school tours and Home of The Blues Train. Gift certificates and vouchers are available for all services, experiences and events.

Werribee Open Range Zoo

Why travel thousands of kilometres, when a taste of African adventure is available just 30 minutes from Melbourne's city centre, at Werribee Open Range Zoo, you will find an amazing array of animals living on 225 hectares of wide, open savannah. On the Pula Reserve Walking Trail, come face-to-face with amazing gorillas, a pride of lions, see monkeys and cheetahs at play and discover a family of hippopotamus at the Kubu River Hippopotamus exhibit. No trip to the Zoo is complete without heading out on safari across grassy plains where you will find rhinoceros, giraffes, zebras and antelopes grazing together on the picturesque savannah. All of the above, including the 40-minute safari tour, is included in the Zoo admission price. For those looking for even more adventure, then why not try one of the behind-the-scenes Wild Encounters. Feed a giraffe, stroke a serval and see amazing animals up close from the open vehicle. Don't miss the latest attractions that are exhibiting at Werribee Open Range Zoo. They have one of the world's largest gorilla exhibits and the new-look luxury Slumber Safari overnight accommodation. Visit the website for more details.
 

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Packages & Offers

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh.

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite.

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

$240 per couple per night

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks, sample some of the regions finest produce, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway.

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh. Make a weekend of exploring Queenscliff with 2 nights’ accommodation at the award-winning BIG4 Beacon Resort including Blues Train tickets, return transfers to the event, buffet breakfast, 6pm checkout, local discounts and more.

Only $487 per couple.

Phone: 1800 351 152 or visit BIG4 Beacon Resort for more information.
 

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite. Enjoy fabulous bonuses including:

  • A $70 dinner voucher
  • Welcome pack including wine, chocolates and a breakfast basket
Stay between Sunday and Thursday nights and receive THREE nights accommodation for the same price.

T: 03 5254 1066
 

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

This winter, guests who book a standard room at our normal Bed and Breakfast rate play golf for free. Want an even better reason to take a break? The Club is rated one of Australia’s Top 10 public access courses.

From $240 per room per night.
($120 p/p twin share)

  • Accommodation in a standard room with ensuite at Barwon Heads Golf Club
  • Fully cooked breakfast
  • A complimentary round of golf each person (normally up to $85 each).

Address: Golf Links Rd, Barwon Heads, Victoria 3227

To book:

Phone: 03 5255 6255
Fax: 03 5255 6266
Website: www.bhgc.com.au
Email: reservations@bhgc.com.au

T&C's: Valid Sunday to Thursday inclusive. 1st June to 31 August 2014. Dress requirements apply on course and in the clubhouse.
 

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

$317 for 2 adults & up to 2 children (save 60%)

  • 2 nights in a Lonsdale Villa
  • Unlimited Mountain Bike Hire
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • A daily Espresso Coffee or Hot Chocolate per person
  • A bottle of local wine
  • Free Daily Kids Activities
  • An extra Long Late Check-out to 6.00pm

Plus get two LI'TYA Deep Ocean Renewal Facials for the price of 1 at the resort's Mud Day Spa (save $120)

And there's plenty of indoor fun at the resort with an indoor heated swimming pool and 8-seater spa, an indoor toddler playroom and a games room. Add another layer of clothing and there's even more to explore outside! BIG4 Beacon Resort is the ideal base to check out Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale.

Phone 1800 351 152 or Book Online.

Terms and Conditions: Offer expires on 31/08/2014

 

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks and find the best spot to capture the setting sun. Sample some of the regions finest artisan products from both the Bellarine and Mornington Peninsulas. Enjoy a regional produce platter with an award winning wine, locally made ale or cider, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

$35.00 per person (includes return sailing between Sorrento and Queenscliff)

Every Friday and Saturday from April to December
4pm sailing from Sorrento
5pm sailing from Queenscliff

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.
Enjoy table service in elegant surroundings, exquisite food, quality tea and real coffee!

$40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.

Every Sunday from February to November
12pm sailing from Sorrento
3pm sailing from Queenscliff.

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway. When life gets a little overwhelming, an escape with your best friends can be the best way to share some uninterrupted catch up time, a little relaxation and, of course, some well-deserved indulgence on looking after you.

$798 is for 4 people ($199.50 per person) and includes:

  • 2 nights accommodation at Beacon Resort in a Curlewis Villa
  • A Food Purveyor "Little Extra" Hamper (special treats from our region including jams, chocolates, tapenade and much much more)
  • 1 x bottle of Jack Rabbit Sparkling
  • 4 x 60 minute relaxation massages in our day spa
  • Return transfers to a venue of choice (within 3225 postcode area during your stay)
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • 12 noon check-out

This offer is valid until the 20th December 2014; No further discounts apply; Some exclusion periods to apply; Package is subject to availability at the time of booking.