Great Ocean Road
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The Region

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The Region

Every trip along the Great Ocean Road region takes a scenic route. While driving through the rainforest you can feel the cool, clean air in every breath. Many walking trails lead to spectacular crashing waterfalls and there are also several trails suitable for mountain biking.

The fertile soil of the hinterland produces high-quality and renowned food. Each of the towns and villages dotted through the region have something unique to offer - award-winning bakeries, boutique breweries and one-of-a-kind shops.

 

 

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Highlights

Auswalk Walking Holidays

Come and experience the real Australia on foot with Auswalk Walking Holidays. Do not watch it pass you by from the windows of a vehicle, get out there and be a part of it! Auswalk Walking Holidays offer guided groups of like-minded people day hikes in fabulous national parks. There are two guides looking after each group, so you will have a choice of easy or hard walks each day. At night stay in comfortable accommodations and enjoy good food and wine. Auswalk Walking Holidays also have self-guided walks through superb National Parks from one accommodation to the next. Walk with your own group of two or more people and start any day of the year. You will be supported along the way with luggage transfers, marked maps and detailed walk notes. Auswalk Walking Holidays can customise a trip for you, your club, group of friends or family. Victorian destinations include the Grampians as it is the best place to see native animals in the wild. There is a rich indigenous history as well as challenging hiking to magnificent rocky peaks. Another great destination is Great Alpine Walk, traverse Victoria's high country, staying overnight in secluded alpine villages. Great Ocean Walk is a long time favourite, this iconic track hugs the southern ocean in parts and ventures inland into the mighty forests of the Otway Ranges. You will see kangaroos while on the track. Great South West Walk is a perfect choice for those who enjoy walking long distances on easy terrain. Highlights include the Glenelg River Gorge and the Three Capes section. Other destinations around the country include the Flinders Ranges, Snowy Mountains and many other beautiful national parks around Australia. Please enquire with Auswalk Walking Holidays for more information.

The Surf Coast Walk

Whether you're a nature lover or a fun lover, whether you take an hour, a day or a week, the Surf Coast Walk puts a stunning and unique coastal environment within easy reach. - Offering natural beauty and easy access - A world-class walking destination for all to enjoy - On the edge of the stunning Great Ocean Road - Do a section or do it all; at your own pace - More than a walk, over half the track is suitable for bikes Relish the rich ochre of the Bells Beach cliffs, the deep blue of Bass Strait and the leafy green of eucalypt forects. Discover traditional Wathaurung country, fascinating surf culture and abundant wildlife as the walk connects you with the coastal town comforts of Torquay, Anglesea and Aireys Inlet.
Coastal Childcare
Near Portland

Coastal Childcare

Coastal Childcare prides itself on providing quality childcare with the flexibility to meet your needs Coastal Childcare is Owner operated by Sheryl Reed, an experienced and police checked carer ensuring your child is left in safe hands. Offering affordable childcare to visitors to the South West Region through very reasonable hourly rates and special package options. Special occasions, weddings, enjoy lunch or dinner parties attend appointments, meetings or workshops, shopping or personal time out.

Coatal Childcare

Coastal Childcare prides itself on providing quality childcare with the flexibility to meet your needs Coastal Childcare is Owner operated by Sheryl Reed, an experienced and police checked carer ensuring your child is left in safe hands. Offering affordable childcare to visitors to the South West Region through very reasonable hourly rates and special package options. Special occasions, weddings, enjoy lunch or dinner parties attend appointments, meetings or workshops, shopping or personal time out.

Otways Forest, Walks & Waterfalls Tours

Beginning in Skenes Creek, the Otway Forests, Walks and Waterfalls tour heads inland toward Turtons Track, a winding stretch of road that looks like it was built for a sports car commercial. Stop at Beech Forest for a coffee before continuing to the Otway Fly and cascading Triplet Falls. Back on the road, head towards the Cape Otway Lightstation. Between May and October keep a lookout for koalas and whales. Back on the road heading toward Apollo Bay, stop at Maits Rest and follow the wooden boardwalk through an ancient forest to a 300 year old Myrtle Beech tree. Finish in Apollo Bay, perhaps with some fresh local fish and a glass of wine. Further details and maps for the Otway Forests, Walks and Waterfalls Tour are available at local visitor information centres.

Otway Harvest Trail

The unique combination of aspect, soils, climate and farming practices of the Otway hinterland produce distinctive and exceptional flavours in our produce that cannot be found anywhere else. The Otway Harvest Trail is a celebration of the seasons that bestow their rich bounty on a luscious part of Victoria. Spring is a time of plenty and promise. As the winter gives way to warm sunny days, see the bright patchwork of yellow canola fields appear, the farmers out mowing their grass and baling their hay and the spring lambs frolicking on a frosty morning. The first berries appear. Green shoots can be seen in the vineyards as the vines burst their buds and flowers and spring vegetables appear at farm gate stalls. New release wines can be found at cellar doors. Summer is all about being outdoors. All the berry farms have opened and their sweet juicy berries are ripe for the picking. The lush emerald green of the vineyards become more distinctive as the land around slowly turns a golden brown. People clamour for outdoor tables and chairs at cafés and restaurants to soak in the warm days, mild evenings and glorious pastel sunsets. Local wines and beers go so well with the seafood, vegetables and fruits in plentiful supply. Wine lovers are welcomed at cellar doors and their curiosity is rewarded with the discovery of new wines. Autumn is a time of harvest. The days become still and warm, and the crisp cool nights are perfect for sleeping. With the winter rains not far away, the wineries are busy harvesting their fruit and the vignerons hands become garnet red as they nurture the new wines through their ferment. It is also time to harvest the olives from their groves before the first frosts of winter arrive. Smell the fruity aroma of the extra virgin olive oil as it flows from the presses. The last of the berries are picked. Winter is a time for taking stock of the seasons passed and making ready for the farming year ahead. The farmers plough their fields and sow their winter crops. Vineyards, olive groves and orchards are pruned and readied for a new season. Fences are mended. The days shorten and become colder. Cattle turn their backs to the wind. Dams pent over the summer begin to refill. Root vegetables appear at the farm gate stands. It’s a time for reflection and for savouring the joys of recently harvested produce. Lengthy conversations occur over bottles of wine in front of toasty log fires. Eventually the tell tale signs of another Spring begin to appear.

Great Ocean Walk

The Great Ocean Walk, on Victoria's spectacular west coast, stretches 104km from the idyllic resort town of Apollo Bay, to within sight of the magnificent 12 Apostles. Weave through beautiful National Parks, walk deserted beaches and gaze over pristine marine sanctuaries. Step on and off the trail with convenience; enjoy comfortable accommodation and excellent local meals or pitch your tent at wildly picturesque spots along the way. You can walk at your own pace and within your own timeframe along the Great Ocean Walk. Short walks of up to 3 hours long are available and take in old shipwrecks, historic lighthouses and lookouts. Or, take a full-day walk and experience breathtaking ocean views, stunning waterfalls, lush forest, and more natural wonders. The full walk from Apollo Bay to Glenample, within sight of the 12 Apostles, is an 8 day, 7 night walk. There are hike in campsites along the way, or for a more luxurious approach stay in quality accommodation properties nearby and have licensed tour operators shuttle you and your belongings back and forth each day.

Bells Beach

With an international reputation as one of Australia’s best surf beaches, Bells Beach is amazing spot – either in the water or out. There isn’t much ‘beach’ at Bells, it’s mostly a glorious cliff-face, and views from the cliff-top car park are spectacular – a great spot to watch local surfers out in the water. There are several quality surfing spots in the precinct from Southside to Steps Reef. Every Easter Bells Beach hosts the international professional surfing community for the Rip Curl Pro event. To get to Bells Beach, travel along the Great Ocean Road past Jan Juc – turn left into Bells Boulevard and follow the signs. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life. SURFING Bells is a world class right when above 1.5 m. When smaller, the waves break close in to the headland and produce a right called Rincon. Further around the head are two more reef breaks which work below 2 m, called Centre Side (a right) and Southside (a left). FISHING The water is deep right off the beach, while at low tide you can fish from the reefs at each end. GENERAL One of the meccas of surfing and well worth a visit, if only to view the beach and surf from the bluffs. CARPARK Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 We provide this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. We remind you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches.

Glow worms in the Otways

The Otways has worms. Glorious little glow worms can be found at sites throughout the Otway National Park after dark. They are generally found in dark, damp places - like soil banks with overhanging ledges, along creek embankments and beside walking tracks. The worms are not actually worms, rather they are the larvae of fly-like insects called fungus gnats. The larvae prey on small insects - as such they produce sticky threads. The glow emitted from their abdomen attracts insects who are then trapped in the sticky threads. Glow worms are shy creatures - torches, loud noises or touching them may disturb the glow worms and case them to 'switch off' their light and retreat into a crack. Glow worms are often found at Melba Gully, and near the Grey River Picnic Area at Kennett River. It's a good idea to take a torch to find your way along the tracks after dark, but avoid shining the light directly at the glow worms.

Surf Torquay

Torquay lives and breathes surfing, and the region has a global reputation as an amazing surf destination. Bells Beach hosts the annual Rip Curl Pro, where the best surfers in the world compete each Easter. Nearby Winkipop is also popular with experienced surfers. Torquay and Jan Juc offer good conditions for those wanting to learn to surf, and several schools operate classes at local beaches. Surf conditions can vary greatly, check with the Visitor Information Centre or local Surf Life Saving Club.

Surf World Museum

The Surf World Museum in Torquay, Australia’s surfing capital, celebrates the story of surfing. It also charts Australia’s significant contribution to the development of surfing around the world. Through the colourful and exciting permanent displays and temporary exhibitions of important surfing artefacts and memorabilia, the museum commemorates Australia’s fantastic surfing heritage and rich beach culture. An unforgettable experience, Surf World provides the opportunity to immerse yourself in one of Australia’s most popular pastimes. It’s a place where you can experience or relive, surfing’s sense of fun, and marvel at the changes that have taken place over the years. We look forward to welcoming you.

Torquay Shopping

As birth place and headquarters for some of the biggest surf brands in Australia, Torquay is a destination for shopping. The main highway into town has shops and plazas, including the large Surf City Plaza, on either side of the road. Every name in surfwear and adventure sports apparel is featured in the precinct. Many of the brands also have factory outlets nearby. As a vibrant and modern seaside destination, Torquay has a number of other shopping precincts. Gilbert Street is considered the centre of town, with supermarkets, bakeries, post office and banks as well as specialty retail and eateries. Torquay Central is a plaza development housing some of Australia’s best known retailers alongside coffee shops and places to eat. Bell Street has a collection of shops, cafes and restaurants as well as the local pub. Some tour operators and learn to surf schools operate from offices in Bell Street.

Longhorn YOUnique Tours

Longhorn YOUnique Tours is a 2015 and 2014 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence Award Winner, offering tours to the Great Ocean Road, the Otway's Rainforest, Grampians, Phillip Island, the Yarra Valley and can also customise a tour to suit your needs. You will see spectacular scenery, wildlife in the natural environment, learn about the area's history and culture, enjoy homemade treats and great accommodation as Longhorn's expert guides take you on a journey of discovery. Eco Tourism and Respecting their Culture accredited, Longhorn YOUnique Tours is a family owned business operated by Garry and Shirley Hamel, two Australians who know and understand the beauty of the country. With a range of tours from one day to multiple day tours and private or customised tours to choose from. Longhorn YOUnique Tours believe that guests should not feel rushed so tours are conducted in small groups travelling in luxury four wheel-drive vehicles with your comfort and needs a top priority. A maximum of six people on each tour will give you a personalised experience to remember. Longhorn YOUnique Tours are part of the Extinction Fighters program and have adopted a Tasmanian Devil at Healesville Sanctuary. Free wireless internet onboard all tours. Contact the friendly staff at Longhorn YOUnique Tours to enquire.
12 Apostles Flight Adventure from Torquay
Near Torquay

12 Apostles Flight Adventure from Torquay

12 Apostles Flight Adventures have over 25 years of flying experience. Take a 12 Apostles Flight Adventure from Torquay in a modern aircraft for a bird's eye view of the world famous Great Ocean Road through to the 12 Apostles. Enjoy aerial views of one of the world's most scenic drives along the Great Ocean Road from Torquay to Apollo Bay, then continue your flight and wing your way along the cliff tops to the 12 Apostles. The Great Ocean Road is carved into sheer cliffs that drop away into the ocean offering commanding views of the waves swelling and crashing onto the rocks and beaches below. From Apollo Bay the road leaves the coast and continues to wind it's way inland through the Otway National Park before returning to the coast at the 12 Apostles. For a flight to operate a minimum of two passengers and a maximum of seven passengers. Maximum weight restrictions may apply to groups. Family or group bookings are also available, please enquire about prices. All flights depart and return to Torquay Airport, a private airfield and home to Tiger Moth World.

Dinny Goonan Wines

One of a handful of families pioneering grape and wine production in the Otway hinterland, Dinny Goonan Wines have won numerous awards since the first commercial release in 2001. The vineyard and cellar door are conveniently situated on the inland road to Lorne, between Winchelsea and Deans Marsh. This location provides a great springboard to explore the Otways and surrounding attractions, and Dinny Goonan Wines are happy to share some local knowledge of other places to see and visit. Visitors are welcome to taste wines and relax in the peaceful vineyard setting. Find out more about the wines by talking to Dinny the winemaker, or stroll around the vineyard and winery. Vineyard platters are available on weekends between December and April and every day during January, so it is a great chance to take some time out to enjoy the wines, surrounded by the vines that produced them. The platters have a regional focus providing the opportunity to match local wines with regional produce. The only distractions will come from the Crimson Rosellas and Blue Winged Grass Parrots that have made the vineyard their home. Dinny Goonan Wines also offer a great coffee and a selection of local foodstuffs and oils. And then of course, there are their award-winning wines. As a family run enterprise, everything is very much "hands on". The vines are hand pruned; Dinny Goonan Wines pick the grapes by hand and use traditional vinification and elevage techniques within the modern winery. Dinny Goonan Wines specialise in the production of cool climate Shiraz and Riesling. Dinny Goonan Wines also produce limited quantities of Cabernets (a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Malbec), a Semillon Sauvignon and a Sparkling wine (a blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay) which are available exclusively to their cellar door customers.
Otways Accommodation
Near Portland

Otways Accommodation

Otways Accommodation is a small, local accommodation directory which lists accommodation options throughout the entire Great Otways National Park. It’s a simple site with no clutter and no annoying ads. Apart from accommodation you'll also be able to find information about tours, local events and festivals, where the best farmstays are and where you can holiday with your pet. You'll find detailed information on the Great Ocean Road and Great Ocean Walk, where the best waterfalls are and how to find them, rainforest walks, beaches and major tourist attractions like the Otway Fly and Cape Otway Lightstation. And high on the bucket list for many visitors to the Otways is our local wildlife. We'll tell you where to find them. The best thing about Otways Accommodation is that it is so easy to use. Simply select your destination, scroll through the list of accommodation options and go direct to the operator’s website.
Ravens Creek Farm
Near Jan Juc

Ravens Creek Farm

Ravens Creek Farm is a truly unique farm shop and cafe with pick-your-own berries. Visit Ravens Creek Farm to experience how a real farm works, try delicious homemade food, organic produce and organic, and fair trade coffee. Plenty of space for the kids to run around. Open every day except Wednesday in December and January. Open Friday to Monday (closed Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) in October to November and February to May.

Surf Coast Arts Trail

Discover the art and meet the artists in their studios and creative venues throughout the hinterland and coast of the Surf Coast Shire - Connewarre, Torquay, Bellbrae, Anglesea, Aireys Inlet, Lorne, Deans Marsh, Bambra, Winchelsea and Moriac Enjoy the diverse arts practices – including: jewellers, ceramic artists, print makers, painters, sculptors, photographers, illustrators, designers and animators. For updates -visit Surf Coast Arts Trail on FACEBOOK Trail maps available online www.visitsurfcoast.com from 19 July Trail maps available to collect at Visitor Centres late July

Around and About Tours

They are a small bus company and have a maximum of 11 people per bus. They cater for all ages on their tours, so great for the whole family. The tours they offer run for either half a day up to seven day tours. They travel to all the great natural attractions within Victoria. Around and About Tours offer free pick-ups from the city and Saint Kilda, they give you free morning tea, a chilled bottle of water, fresh fruit and free park entry. Tour prices vary depending on the length of tour, number of people, the attractions visited and type of accommodation required. Regarding accommodation they will work to your budget and requests. They can make use of caravan park cabins, backpacker hostels or they can use five star hotels, it is totally up to you. For tour longer than one day we require a group of six or more. For any further information please contact Around and About Tours or view their website.

Forrest Mountain Biking

There are 8 separate mountain bike trails in the Forrest Mountain Bike precinct. There is more than 50km of purpose built track in the area ranging from rated from easy trails to extreme and strenuous tracks. The Otway Odyssey, Forrest 6 hr ride and Rainforest Ride events during the year are adding to Forrest’s reputation among the growing Australian mountain bike community.

Anglesea Art Walk

Spanning 2.5 kilometres and featuring six mosaic art pieces, the Anglesea Art Walk highlights the history and unique flora and fauna of this extraordinary place. It starts at the JE Loveridge lookout with sensational panoramic views of the Surf Coast and concludes in the valley at the Anglesea Primary School.

Anglesea Heath

Superb native flowers and rare orchids bloom in the coastal heathlands during spring. Amazingly, over a quarter of Victoria’s plant species grow here including more than 100 varieties of orchids, some of them so rare they are on the verge of extinction. Many vehicle tracks and walking trails offer photographers, walkers, artists and bird watchers great viewing opportunities.

Anglesea Mountain Bike Riding

Anglesea has become well known for its fantastic mountain bike tracks. The state of the art Anglesea Bike Park has over 500m of mountain cross and jump tracks and will provide challenges for novice and experienced riders alike. Surrounding the bike park is a series of trails ideal for cross country mountain biking. It is located in Camp Road, Anglesea and is open daily.

Anglesea Riverbank

A series of flowing channels connected by bike paths and bridges make Anglesea River a popular destination for activities such as fishing from one of the many platforms, canoeing, windsurfing, sailing or hiring a paddle boat. The wide river is ideal for numerous activities to suit all ages. The many bbq’s and tables along the riverbank also make it an ideal picnic area. The river and its surroundings is also an important habitat for native wildlife including owls, possums, echidnas, kangaroo and wallabies, as well as native fish, eels and many species of waterbird.

Anglesea Shopping

There is a shopping strip in Anglesea with the regulation variety of specialty shops as well as supermarkets, food outlets and services. The Riverbank provides eateries & galleries with a river view, near the main beach are the surf schools and hire shops. There are also galleries featuring local art and several tour operators, activities and equipment hire shops in the vicinity.

Apollo Bay Fishing

There are loads of great fishing spots in and around Apollo Bay. Try near the harbour, from the beach or just beyond the point towards Marengo. There are also freshwater streams nearby worth a try.

Aireys Inlet Horse Riding

Ride along pristine beaches and take in some of Australia's most beautiful coastal scenery. Sunset rides are particularly special. Enjoy the exhilarating feeling of galloping along the sand with the wind in your hair or ride along coastal cliff tops in beautiful bushland settings. Local trail riding company Blazing Saddles offers guided and instructional tours if you can’t BYO horse.

Erskine Falls and Straw Falls

Car park options - Erskine Falls car park (300m return walk to falls 1st lookout, 700 m to 2nd lookout) Walking track information (Erskine River Track) - Start: Erskine Falls car park - Finish: Lorne - Distance: 7.5 km one way - Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details Erskine Falls is a short drive out of Lorne on appropriately named Erskine Falls Road. It is one of the most popular falls in the Otways and easily accessible. A five-minute walk from the car park brings you to a lookout of the falls, cascading 30 metres into a beautiful tree fern gullyYou also can take steps down to the Erskine River to view the falls from below. . Straw Falls are a 15m cascade on the Erskine River and are a further 400m downstreams of Erskine Falls. Experienced walkers can follow the river from Erksine Falls to Lorne. The 7.5km one-way walk takes about three hours and passes Straw Falls and Splitter Falls. It should not be attempted when water levels are high.

Otways Wine & Food Lovers Trail

This trail traverses some of the most fertile land in Victoria which grows some of the state’s best produce. Breakfast can be enjoyed anywhere between Apollo Bay and Lorne before turning left into the Otways hinterland. The Deans Marsh and Pennyroyal area is renowned for its berries, olives and wineries. Further North, Birregurra is the hub of Otway produce and the perfect lunch stop. Heading back towards the Great Ocean Road via Forrest, which has a boutique brewery and an atmospheric cafe. Continue South through towering rainforest to Apollo Bay. Brochures for the Otway Harvest Trail, which details the growers and producers in this hinterland region, are available at local visitor information centres.

Coogarah Park

Popular with families for its shipwreck playground, BBQ facilities and picnic areas, Coogarah Park set on the riverbank just a couple of minutes from the centre of town provides the children with hours of entertainment. There are also walking tracks and a skate park in the grounds.

Country Dahlia

Country Dahlia is a flower farm offering Australia’s largest collection of Dahlias. Spread across 2 acres and with 1,800 different types of flower, you can visit beautiful Country Dahlia during March and April each year and are welcome to bring a picnic lunch with you. Tea and coffee are available.

Cumberland River Beach

The Cumberland River flows through a steep-sided, 200 m wide valley containing a flat, riverside reserve. It reaches the coast in an open, south-east facing bay. The Great Ocean Road hugs the base of the bluff north of the river, then winds in to cross the river, before continuing south along the base of the bluffs. There is a 150 m long beach immediately north of the river mouth, with the road forming its rear boundary. The river mouth beach is 250 m long and is crossed by the creek and backed by a low, grassy area. There is a car park just north of the bridge and a caravan park on the west side of the road. The two beaches face south-east and are exposed to waves averaging 1.5 m. The waves interact with the sand and rock platforms to produce an 80 m wide surf zone. This is dominated by one permanent rip to the north, as well as rips against each end of the river mouth beach. Swimming Be very careful if swimming here, as rip feeder currents run the length of both beaches, with strong rips at either end of both beaches. Surfing There are reasonable beach breaks on both beaches, that work in low to moderate swell. Fishing This is a popular location with the choice of creek, creek mouth, beach and rock fishing, plus a caravan park next door. General A picturesque valley and beach with good access, but a hazardous surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 30 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Cumberland River North Beach

The Cumberland River flows through a steep-sided, 200 m wide valley containing a flat, riverside reserve. It reaches the coast in an open, south-east facing bay. The Great Ocean Road hugs the base of the bluff north of the river, then winds in to cross the river, before continuing south along the base of the bluffs. There is a 150 m long beach immediately north of the river mouth, with the road forming its rear boundary. The river mouth beach is 250 m long and is crossed by the creek and backed by a low, grassy area. There is a car park just north of the bridge and a caravan park on the west side of the road. The two beaches face south-east and are exposed to waves averaging 1.5 m. The waves interact with the sand and rock platforms to produce an 80 m wide surf zone. This is dominated by one permanent rip to the north, as well as rips against each end of the river mouth beach. Swimming Be very careful if swimming here, as rip feeder currents run the length of both beaches, with strong rips at either end of both beaches. Surfing There are reasonable beach breaks on both beaches, that work in low to moderate swell. Fishing This is a popular location with the choice of creek, creek mouth, beach and rock fishing, plus a caravan park next door. General A picturesque valley and beach with good access, but a hazardous surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 40 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life. Beach

Currawong Falls

The Currawong Falls are at their best in the winter and spring and the site offers fine views of the surrounding countryside. Access to the falls is via a moderate 4-hour return walk from the Distillery Creek picnic ground.

Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary

At the base of the Split Point Lighthouse, the 17 hectare Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary is home to a huge variety of marine life. Popular with snorkellers and scuba divers, you can expect to see a diverse range of invertebrates. The rockpools around the sandy coves in this area are also teeming with marine life and are terrific for families to explore.

Cinema Point Beach

At Cinema Point, the winding, cliff hanging section of the Great Ocean Road begins. Cinema Point is a 30 m high, grassy knoll, backed by the road and surrounded by sandstone rock platforms. There are two small beaches here, one on either side. The eastern one is below the car park and viewing area immediately behind the knoll. It is 50 m long, faces east, is backed by road fill and the knoll, and is dominated by platforms and reefs. On the western side of the point is the main beach, that occupies the deep gully carved by Grassy Creek. It consists of a veneer of sand over rock platforms. Both beaches receive waves averaging about 1 m and have a surf zone entirely dominated by rocks and reefs. Swimming Be very careful if bathing here, as permanent rip currents drain out from both reefs, and rocks and reefs abound in the surf. Surfing The north side of Cinema Rocks is known as Hunters or Shark Alley. It has a moderate right hander during big swell. Fishing The extensive rock platforms at low tide provide good access to the rock gullies on either side of the point. General A favourite viewing site, with the beaches used by surfers and fishers, but unsuitable for safe bathing. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 15 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Fairhaven Beach

Six kilometre long Fairhaven Beach is the longest beach on the Great Ocean Road, from which it is readily accessible, as the road backs the entire beach. The beach runs due west from the mouth of Moggs Creek for 4 km, before slowly curving around to face east at the western Cinema Point. The southerly aspect exposes the beach to waves averaging 1.5 m, which combine with the fine to medium beach sand to produce a 200 m wide surf zone containing two bars. The inner bar is cut by rips every 300 m, resulting in up to 20 rips along the beach. The outer bar, which only breaks in higher waves, has more widely spaced rips, when it is active. The Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1957, is located toward the eastern end of the beach, and its members annually average 10 rescues. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, with usually moderate waves and persistent and often strong rips. Westerly winds intensify longshore and rip currents. Stay in the patrolled area on the attached inner bar. Surfing The beach has numerous beach breaks and usually a good swell. However, it is exposed and works best with northerly winds. Some well-known spots along the beach include the mouth of Moggs Creek, where low summer lefts can be found; The Spot, a reef break just east of the surf lifesaving club; and further down at Eastern View and Spouts Creek. Fishing The good access and numerous rips and holes make this a popular, although usually uncrowded, spot for beach fishing. The mouths of Moggs and Spout Creeks are also popular, when they are flowing. General A long, natural beach more suited to experienced bathers and surfers, with the patrolled area in front of the surf club offering the safest bathing area. Toward the western end of the beach is a Memorial Arch commemorating the construction of the Great Ocean Road during the depression years of the 1930s. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club

The 6 km long Fairhaven Beach is the longest beach on the Great Ocean Road. The Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1957, is located toward the eastern end of the beach - and its members average 10 rescues annually. The bar and restaurant are open during the summer months.

Southside - Bells Beach

Southside Beach is located on the southern side of Bells Headland. Unlike its neighbour, Southside is composed of finer sand and has a wide beach and surf zone, with rocks only outcropping toward the northern end of the beach. The beach is 1 km long, lying between Bells and Jarosite Headlands. It is backed by an amphitheatre of slumped sands and clays, that forms an eroding, 10 m high bluff and cobble storm beach along the back of the sand. It faces the south-east and receives waves averaging 1.5 m. Combined with the fine sand, these produce a wide surf zone, usually containing a permanent rip against each headland and one to two rips toward the centre. The road to Bells Beach runs past the northern end of the beach and there is a cliff-top car park on Bells Headland, with a walking track down to the beach. The beach is also an official Optional Dress (nude) Beach. Swimming This is a potentially hazardous beach, with permanent rips and some rocks in the surf. Stay inshore on the bar and well clear of the rocks and headlands. Surfing The best known breaks are at the headlands, with a left called Southside off Bells Headland, and Jarraside out from the southern end of the beach. Fishing There are deep rip gutters off the headlands, as well as beach holes and gutters. General An energetic and potentially hazardous beach, fine for sunbathing but be careful if swimming. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 20 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Blanket Bay

Nestled in the Otway National Park this protected beach, adjoins the Blanket Bay Camping/Picnic area. There are lots of great rockpools for children to explore at either end of the beach. Take care when swimming because this unpatrolled beach can get choppy and may have rips. Off the Great Ocean Road, about 35kms from Apollo Bay

Cape Otway to Aire River Hike

Explore the lightstation before you set out. The walk to Aire River carves its way through a wind sculpted landscape of sand dunes, coastal scrubland and calcified cliffs. Rainbow Falls and Station Beach are a 3 kilometre return journey. Rainbow Falls is spring-fed and trickles through algae to the rock platform below. Take the main track over Station Beach or the beach route to Aire River lookout. Distance: 10km Duration: 4 hours Grade: Medium Start: Cape Otway Finish: Aire River.

Castle Cove

Located on a spectacular bend of the Great Ocean Road at Glenaire, Castle Cove is easily accessible with towering cliffs, a pull-over parking bay and steps to the beach. The area has high archaeological significance, with dinosaur fossils found there in recent times. This unpatrolled beach is not recommended for swimming.

Colac Botanic Gardens

On the Lake Colac foreshore, the Botanic Gardens were redesigned by William Guilfoyle in 1910. The slope facing the lake was terraced to provide viewing for events such as rowing regattas, while the original caretakers cottage now houses a café and gallery. This is only one of two drive-through botanic gardens in Victoria.

Colac Heritage Walk

The Colac Heritage Walk takes in the architecture and history of many buildings around town including churches and the railway station. Further information and maps are available at the local visitor information centre.

Colac Shopping

As the largest regional centre in the Otways district, Colac has a lively retail scene. Shops range the spectrum from small boutique giftwares, antiques and collectables through to major national brands and department stores. Most of the shopping areas are on the main street in town, Murray Street (Princes Highway).

Apollo Bay Harbour

The Apollo Bay Fishing Fleet is moored at the harbour, sheltered by a large breakwater. As a working harbour it is an interesting site to wander through and see the professional fishermen either unloading their catch or preparing to depart on another voyage to sea. Apollo Bay is renowned for crayfish, and the stacks of lobster pots stacked up on the wharves make an interesting spectacle. The daily catch is available fresh from the boat at the local fishermens cooperative.

Jan Juc Beach

Jan Juc Beach is located immediately south of Torquay and is a little more exposed, receiving waves averaging 1.4 m. It extends for 1.2 km between Rocky Point and Bird Rock and faces almost due south, resulting in larger waves. The waves combine with the fine to medium sand to produce a single bar cut by three to four rips, with permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The northern half of the beach is backed by low bluffs, partly covered by dunes. The surf lifesaving club, parking and access, together with Jan Juc Creek, are in the centre, while the narrow, southern half of the beach is backed by 20 m high cliffs. The Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club was founded in 1963 and annually rescues an average of 30 people. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, owing to the high waves and persistent rips. More suitable for experienced bathers and surfers. Stay between the flags and away from the rips and rocks. Surfing Usually variable beach breaks, however Bird Rock can provide excellent rights with a moderate swell and high tide. Fishing Best toward the northern end where rip holes are more persistent. General Jan Juc is Torquay's second and more exposed surfing beach. Still popular in summer for those escaping the Torquay crowds, however the variable beach and surf conditions warrant extra care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Johanna

Towering cliffs frame the pristine sandy beach. Excellent surfing. An alternative venue for world surfing titles when there's no surf at Bells Beach. Unsafe for swimming. Off the Great Ocean Road, about 30kms from Apollo Bay.

Koala and wildlife Spotting

The coastal bushland between Lorne and Apollo Bay is home to a large population of koalas. A short drive up Grey River Road is usually rewarded with a sighting and, as soon as you’ve spotted one, you’ll be an expert spotter! During cooler months whales are often spotted offshore as they migrate from Antarctica or use the sheltered beaches in the region to deliver and nurse calves. A nocturnal visit to the Kennett River picnic ground will also reveal tiny but glorious glow worms.

Lake Elizabeth

Magically secluded and breathtakingly beautiful, Lake Elizabeth offers several walks of varying lengths and is home to a large variety of waterbirds and platypus. The tranquil lake was created by a massive landslide in 1952 and is perfect for walks, picnics and a dawn or dusk canoe tour to see the platypus.

Learn to Surf

What better place to learn to surf than in the birthplace of Australian surfing? There are several licensed tour operators and qualified instructors who run learn to surf classes on beaches close to Torquay. Catering for individuals or groups, often equipment hire and transport can be included in the price.

Lighthouse Cemetary and Lookout Walk

The gravel path leads walkers through beard heath to a lookout point with views across to the lighthouse, telegraph station and the ocean. Visit the historic cemetery which bears witness to the harsh isolation of early lightstation life. Fee applies for Cape Otway Lightstation entry. Distance: 1.6km Duration: 40 minutes Grade: Easy Start: Cape Otway Lightstation car park Finish: Cemetery.

Lorne Locals Love Lorne

We are passionate about the ongoing sustainability of our community. We feel it is vitally important to support local people, local businesses and regional produce to ensure our small community of just 967 people continues to thrive. We don’t just say this, we live and breathe our passion and commitment to our community, daily. We hope you visit us regularly and, if you don’t already, we would love you to Love Lorne as much as we do. We recommend you sign up for our regular e-newsletter, Facebook and Twitter so we can keep you posted on the latest news. We’ll let you know when the whales are in town, what the weather’s doing and any must-see and do things going on around town. Really, we just want to make sure you feel a part of our extended family! Facebook: www.facebook.com/WeLoveLorne Twitter: twitter.com/welovelorne# Mailing list: www.lovelorne.com/join

Lorne Beach and Foreshore

The wide ribbon of sand and gentle waves make Lorne Beach on Loutit Bay a perfect spot for swimmers, surfers and frolickers alike. The sand is only a short stroll from Mountjoy Parade, there are shower and toilet facilities and the beach is patrolled in Summer. In the foreshore reserve area there is a children’s playground, swimming pool, skate park, trampoline hire and lots of open space for games and picnics.

Lorne Fishing

The best fishing spots in Lorne include Reedy Creek, Loutit Bay, Lorne Pier and Lorne Beach. There are also some opportunities for freshwater fishing in the hinterland areas. Fishing licenses are available at the Lorne Visitor Information Centre.

Lorne Heritage Buildings

The Grand Pacific Hotel The Grand Pacific Hotel was built in the 1870’s as one of the first hotels along the Great Ocean Road. Victoria's Lieutenant-Governor declared the Great Ocean Road officially open at a ceremony near Lorne's Grand Pacific Hotel, the site where the project's first survey peg had also been hammered into the ground 14 years before. The Pier became a new focal point for the town’s people, especially after 1879 when Henry Gwynne built the impressive three-storey Grand Pacific Hotel. Henry Gwynne suffered a serious blow-out of costs during construction and the estimated $12,000 ended up costing $24,000. Opening day for the hotel was January 1880, and Cobb and Co Coaches provided a special express service for early guests. Originally it was accessed only by sea with superb views in one of the most unique settings on the coast, opposite the Lorne pier. It has been fully restored and now offers all modern services in a classic restored building. Erskine House Erskine House is of significant historical importance as the oldest guesthouse in Victoria and has been in continuous operation for 136 years. These days, the guesthouse is under redevelopment and is now known as Mantra Erskine on the Beach. Cora Lynn Lorne had two hotels and fifteen guesthouses in its heyday. The Cora Lynn was one of the last early guesthouses still to be seen after crossing the bridge. During 1998 the former Cora Lynn guest house was developed into 26 units. The two large statues are named Cora and Lynn. These statues were made by Graeme Wilkie from Qdos. The name Cora-Lynn came from a gentlemen by the name of “Hunt” who had a property in Deans Marsh named Cora-Lynn.

Lorne History

The Surf Coast has a long Koori history with various Wathaurong tribe clans living in the area for tens of thousands of years. White settlement began in the mid-1800s and soon overwhelmed the indigenous population. Commercial and agricultural pursuits helped establish settlements along the coast, including Lorne, and inland. A brief history Prior to European settlement, the area was occupied by the Kolakngat Aborigines. Lorne is situated on a bay named after Captain Louttit, who sought shelter there in 1841 while supervising the retrieval of cargo from a nearby shipwreck. The coast was surveyed five years later in 1846. The first European settler was William Lindsay, a timber-cutter who began felling the area in 1849. The first telegraph arrived in 1859. Subdivision began in 1869 and in 1871 the town was named after the Marquis of Lorne from Argyleshire in Scotland on the occasion of his marriage to one of Queen Victoria's daughters. Rudyard Kipling In 1891 the area was visited by Rudyard Kipling who was inspired to write the poem Flowers, which included the line:"Buy my hot-wood clematis, Buy a frond of fern, Gathered where the Erskine leaps Down the road to Lorne." Kipling was one of the most popular writers in English, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India, and best known today for his children's books The Great Ocean Road connection By 1922 the Great Ocean Road was extended to Lorne, making the town much more accessible. The first passenger service to Geelong was established in 1924 and guesthouses began to appear after 1930. The Great Ocean Road which stretches along the South Eastern coast of Australia between the Victorian cities of Geelong, Lorne and Warrnambool is the world's biggest war memorial. It was built between World War I and World War II by returned servicemen in honour of their fallen comrades. The road took 16 years to build and it was all done by hand using picks, shovels and dynamite.

Lorne Pier

The start of the famous ocean swimming race ‘The Pier to Pub’, the Lorne Pier is also a popular spot for fishing. Garfish, salmon and barracouta are commonly caught here. The Lorne pier is at the Western end of Loutit Bay.

Lorne Rides

Lorne has four set rides. Ratings range from easy, for all ages on the flat, to hard in the steep hilly sections. With times from 30 minutes to three hours, and optional extensions, the rides cover the town, coast, bush and Erskine Falls. The hills around Lorne provide a bit of a challenge, but you can enjoy a leisurely cycle around the main street and down to the pier. If you like a bit of a challenge, the Forests and Flowers Mountain Bike Ride is a moderate to hard circuit of 35km, with plenty of scenic rewards. The ride starts at the Lorne Visitor Information Centre with an almost 9km climb through the forest in its first section. Highlights include Erskine Falls and giant tree ferns. The second, less-taxing section, follows the Benwerrin-Mt Sabine Road through the tall Otways forest. The final section is downhill run along Deans Marsh Road back to Lorne.

Lorne Shopping

Mountjoy Parade is the main strip in Lorne, and is a great place for shopping with a view – the street overlooks Loutit Bay. There are loads of specialty stores, fashion boutiques, giftware, souvenirs as well as the pharmacy, post office and other services.

Lorne Walks & Waterfalls

The Great Otway National Park is a spectacular area of native forest, and there are plenty of opportunities to get closer to nature with walking tracks and trails in the area, many leading to spectacular crashing waterfalls. There are seven waterfalls within the bushland surrounding Lorne, with different accessibility levels – some are a quick ten minute stroll from the carpark, others are a more strenuous rainforest hike rewarded with the majestic roar of a waterfall. CORA LYNN CASCADES Car park options: - Blanket Leaf picnic ground carpark (4 km return walk to the falls) - Cora Lynn Cascades carpark (7 km return walk to the falls) - Allenvale Mill carpark (8 km return walk to the falls) Walking track information: - Start: Blanket Leaf picnic ground, off Erskine Falls Road - Finish: Allenvale Mill car park - Distance: 4 km return to Cora Lynn cascades, 12 km return to Allenvale Mill - Duration: 2 hours to Cora Lynn cascades, 5 1/2 hours to Allenvale Mill - Difficulty: Moderate (to Cora Lynn cascades), Strenuous (to Allenvale Mill) Details: The Cora Lynn Cascades walk passes through fern gullies and rocky gorges to Cora Lynn Cascades (about 2 km from the picnic area). The next section (from the Cascades to the Cora Lynn carpark) is only for experienced walkers. From the carpark the track continues on to Phantom Falls to Allenvale Road. From here you can walk east along Allenvale Road then turn left onto the Green Break Track which joins up with Erskine Falls Road which leads back to the picnic area. Another option is to follow Saint George River from the Allenvale Mill site to the coast. ERSKINE FALLS & STRAW FALLS Car park options: - Erskine Falls car park (300m return walk to falls 1st lookout, 700 m to 2nd lookout) Walking track information (Erskine River Track): - Start: Erskine Falls car park - Finish: Lorne - Distance: 7.5 km one way - Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: Erskine Falls is a short drive out of Lorne on appropriately named Erskine Falls Road. It is one of the most popular falls in the Otways and easily accessible. A five-minute walk from the car park brings you to a lookout of the falls, cascading 30 metres into a beautiful tree fern gullyYou also can take steps down to the Erskine River to view the falls from below. . Straw Falls are a 15m cascade on the Erskine River and are a further 400m downstreams of Erskine Falls. Experienced walkers can follow the river from Erksine Falls to Lorne. The 7.5km one-way walk takes about three hours and passes Straw Falls and Splitter Falls. It should not be attempted when water levels are high. HENDERSON FALLS, THE CANYON & PHANTOM FALLS Car park options: - Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark, along Allenvale Rd (21/2 hours return walk to Phantom Falls) - Allenvale Mill site, on Allenvale Road (90 minute return walk to Phantom Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Distance: 6.5 km return - Duration: 21/2 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: Henderson Falls, the Canyon and Phantom Falls are reached from the Sheoak Creek Picnic area, along Allenvale Rd. There are barbecue facilities, toilets, picnic tables, fireplaces and drinking water. From the Canyon, you can return to Sheoak picnic area by the same track or continue on to Phantom Falls and then down to the Allenvale Mill carpark and along Allenvale Rd back to the Sheoak picnic area. On the way is also Won Wondha Falls. Henderson Falls is about 8 to10 meters, Panthom Falls about 15 meters high. The total distance of this circuit is around 9 km. KALIMNA FALLS (UPPER & LOWER FALLS) Car park options: - Sheoak picnic area carpark (2.5 hours walk to Lower Falls, 31/2 hours to Upper Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: Lower Falls – 6.5 km; Upper Falls – 8.5 km - Duration: Lower Falls – 21/2 hours: Upper Falls – 31/2 hours - Difficulty: Easy Details: The Sheoak picnic area, is a 4km drive from Lorne. The Kalimna falls are fringed by tall rainforest trees and dense tree ferns. The Lower Falls are not large, but you can get behind them and look out through the falling water to the large pool surrounded by mossy logs and rocks. The Upper Falls are a series of cascades viewed from a platform. The walk follows the route of an old tramway and some of the old sleepers can still be seen. The return walk to the picnic area can be made along Garvey track. SHEOAK FALLS Car park options: - Sheoak picnic area carpark (10 minutes walk to Sheoak Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: 7 km return • Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Moderate Details: Head south-east from the Sheoak Picnic Area along Sheoak Creek to Swallow Cave (where swallows nest in the rock crevices in spring) and on for another 400 m to the 15-metre Sheoak Falls (this section of the walk should not be attempted when water levels are high). While not falling for a great distance, the water passes over a dark rock face within a natural amphitheatre, making for spectacular viewing. Return a very short distance towards Swallow Cave then branch off to the left along the Sheoak/Castle Rock Track. After about 1.3 km there is a track junction. Turn left to Castle Rock where there is a lookout then return to the junction. Keep to the left, following the Sheoak Track north to Garveys Track which leads back to the Picnic Area. CUMBERLAND FALLS Car park options: - Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River (3 hours walk return) - Sheoak picnic area carpark Walking track information: - Start: Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River - Finish: Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River - Distance: 9 km return - Duration: 4.5 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: About 6 km south of Lorne along the Great Ocean Road is a picnic area at the mouth of the Cumberland River. You can take the Cumberland Falls Walk by following the river for about 3 km past some excellent clifftop scenery to the Cumberland Cascades (not to be attempted when the river level is high). Return the way you came for nearly 1 km but then take the track on the left which follows a ridge north to Garveys Track. Turn right onto the latter but turn right again almost immediately onto the Sheoak Track to Castle Rock. From Castle Rock return along the track for a couple of hundred metres to the track junction and turn right. The track leads to Sheoak Falls then on to the Great Ocean Road carpark which can be followed back to the Cumberland River Reserve. CURRAWONG FALLS (AIREYS INLET) Car park options: - Lower carpark, Distillery Creek picnic area (near Aireys Inlet) Walking track information: - Start: Distillery Creek picnic area carpark - Finish: Distillery Creek picnic area carpark - Distance: 12 km return - Duration: 4 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: The Currawong Falls are at their best in the winter and spring and the site offers fine views of the surrounding countryside. The walk reveals a fascinating range of habitats: ironbark and other eucalypt forests, melaleuca swamps, fern gullies, sheoak stands on high ridges with panoramic views, and steep-sided gorges.

Maits Rest

Maits Rest, renowned for its natural beauty, is a must-see destination. Named after former forestry patrol officer Maitland Bryant, Maits Rest has a short walk that meanders through a tranquil fern garden, past huge moss-covered trees. Some are up to 300 years old. BOARDWALK & WILDLIFE A wooden boardwalk has been built over the tree-fern gullies and moss-covered roots of ancient rainforest trees, protecting the delicate ecosystem while providing visitors with unique views of the forest. If you’re lucky, you may run into some of the local inhabitants, including swamp wallabies, koalas, ring-tailed possums and grey kangaroos. Rarely seen, but often heard at night, are the yellow-bellied gliders screaming out as they glide from tree to tree. How to get there Maits Rest is located 15 minutes west of Apollo Bay on the Great Ocean Road.

Marengo to Shelly Beach Hike

Follow low cliff tops overlooking the ocean and the exposed and aptly named Bald Hill. It traverses on and off the beach through sheltered forest to picturesque Shelly Beach. Coastal route at low tide and during calm seas. Distance: 4.7km Duration: 2 hours Grade: Medium Start: Marengo caravan park Finish: Shelly Beach picnic area

Marriners Lookout

Marriners Lookout is located atop a hill on the Norther outskirts of Apollo Bay. An easy 10 minute walk from the carpark is rewarded with spectacular ocean, beach, hinterland and town views. If you're feeling more energeticm walk about 1.5 kms north from Apollo Bay along the beach or Great Ocean Road, then climb a steep hill along a surfaced road for another 1.5 km to the lookout track. This is also a popular take-off point for hang gliders, so with the right conditions you may see someone take off.

Old Beechy Trail

Running between Colac and Beech Forest, the trail traverses an railway line, rainforest, creeks, streams and open farmland. The 45km track is surfaced with gravel and some dirt road/heavy gravel in shorter sections. A word of advice that may influence your travel direction – Gellibrand is the lowest point and Beech Forest one of the highest.

Painkalac Creek Playground

The Painkalac Creek playground is set in a picturesque location, with views to the Split Point Lighthouse. This reserve adjoins Aireys Inlet Skate Park and is ideal for a family picnic or BBQ. There is plenty of open space for game of cricket, a kick of the footy or flying kites. Aireys Inlet has two other playgrounds located at the Community Centre and the Bark Hut Reserve.

Princetown to Glenample Hike

Take this walk and be rewarded with spectacular views of the 12 Apostles. Hike along cliff tops through coastal scrubland and low heath to Glenample. Kangaroos are regular grazers in nearby paddocks and pods of dolphins can sometimes be seen in the Marine National Park below. Distance: 5.5km Duration: 2.5 hours Grade: Medium Start: Princetown Recreation Reserve Finish: Glenample.

Red Rock

The Red Rock lookout, 12 km from Colac, is one of Australia’s youngest volcanoes. Forty separate eruption points have been found, and many of the craters are now full of water. The area is the third largest volcanic plain in the world and estimated to be 8,000 years old. The volcanic complex consists of overlapping maars, scoria cones and small lava flows. From the lookout, the magnificent 360 degree views include the topography of the volcanic plain and the 25,000 hectare Lake Corangamite.

Shelley Beach Circuit

This is one of the best short walks on the Great Ocean Walk. The track traverses through fern gullies, coastal scrub, along Shelly Beach and across rocky platforms to Elliot River. Return through a majestic stand of blue gums, inhabited by koalas and nocturnal Yellow-bellied Gliders. Distance: 2km Duration: 45 minutes Grade: Easy Start: Shelly Beach picnic area Finish: Shelly Beach picnic area.

Split Point Lighthouse

The Split Point Lighthouse dominates the Aireys Inlet landscape, its 34 metre high tower and typical red cap visible for miles. The still operating lighthouse is open to the public with guided tours available and sweeping views of the Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary and Great Ocean Road region below. The grounds surrounding the lighthouse include a replica of the ‘bark hut’ early settlers in Aireys Inlet would have lived in, and the beach at the base of the lighthouse has great rockpools to explore.

Teddy's Lookout

At the end of George Street, Teddy’s Lookout offers spectacular views of the St. George River and the Great Ocean Road coastline. There is walking trail connecting Teddy’s Lookout with two other lookouts, and takes about 30 minutes return.

The Gables Lookout Walk

This easy return walk travels through a Casuarina grove to a spectacular lookout over the ocean and the reefs around Moonlight Head. This is one of the highest sea cliffs on mainland Australia. Keep a close eye out for seabirds, or whales from June to September. Distance: 800m Duration: 20 minutes Grade: Easy Start: The Gable car park Finish: The Gable Lookout.

Sundial of Human Involvement

Picturesquely located on the foreshore land at Fishermans Beach at the corner of Darian Road and The Esplanade, the sundial was assembled in the traditional and time-honoured method of mosaic and comprises more than 120,000 glass Tesserae tiles. The sundial represents the traditional dreaming stories of the indigenous Wathaurong people. Your body becomes the ‘dial’ on this unique piece of art. Stand in the centre of the design and you can tell the time by the shadow cast by your body.

Cycle Torquay

Cycling is a great way to explore the gorgeous coastal and hinterland scenery around Torquay. There are terrific road rides for serious and recreational riders, as well as off road trails to suit mountain bikers or family groups.

Torquay Fishermans Beach

Fishermans Beach, as the name suggests, is a low energy beach traditionally used to launch fishing boats. This is still true today with a boat ramp on the beach, as well as sailing, yacht, and motor boat clubs all located behind the western end of the beach. The beach lies in Zeally Bay and runs south-west for 1 km from the mouth of the small Deep Creek, then south to the 10 m high limestone bluffs at Yellow Bluff. The entire beach is backed by a foreshore reserve and The Esplanade. It has parking areas and other facilities. Swimming A relatively safe beach with a wide, shallow bar and usually no rips. Stay clear of the boating activity near the ramp and boat clubs. Surfing Usually a low shorebreak. Big winter swells do however break over the shallow reefs and bars to produce reasonable waves, when everything else is closed out. Fishing Best off Yellow Bluff at high tide where you can reach the reef. At low tide, shallow water and exposed reefs dominate. General This is Torquay's most protected beach and is very popular in summer with those who are looking for quieter surf conditions. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Fishing

When one of the local patches of sand becomes known as Fishermans Beach you know you’re in an area worth throwing a line in. Surf fishing from the beach is the most popular, with some good spots around the creek mouths and near Birdrock at Jan Juc. Regular catches in the area include snapper, trevally, whiting, mullet, salmon, bream and flathead. Taking a boat out to the deeper water just offshore can be rewarded with sharks and barracouta.

Torquay Front Beach

Torquay's Front Beach fronts the town centre. It is a well-appointed beach with a well-maintained foreshore reserve between The Esplanade and the beach. There are numerous facilities in the reserve, including a tourist information centre. A seawall and a row of tall Norfolk Island pines back the beach, and several wooden groynes cross the beach. The beach faces due east and runs for 1 km from Yellow Bluff to Point Danger. The point and its reefs protect the beach, which receives waves averaging less than 1 m. These maintain a shallow, continuous, attached bar. Swimming This is Torquay's most popular family beach, with usually low waves, a shallow bar and no rips, plus the added safety of a summer lifeguard patrol. Surfing Usually a low beach break used by learners. During big swell, waves can make it around Point Danger to break as right handers off Front Beach. Fishing The best location is on Point Danger. However, watch the waves and tides, as it is awash at high tide. General Torquay's showpiece beach with good access, facilities, a lifeguard and usually low, safe surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Point Impossible Beach

Point Impossible is a low, calcarenite point, capped by 10 m high foredunes and bordered by the mouth of Thompson Creek. The gravel road from Torquay runs out to the point, where there is a large car park. A small beach (Point Impossible Beach) lies in front of the car park and forms the western boundary of Thompson Creek. A foreshore reserve and the road back the 4.5 km long Whites Beach, with car parks and access tracks across the dune. The eastern section of the beach, just back from the point, is an official Optional Dress (nude) Beach. The beach faces south-east and is protected to the south by Point Danger, and along the central-eastern section by extensive rock reefs. As a result, waves average 1 m at the beach and usually produce a continuous, shallow bar only cut by rips during and following high seas. Swimming The small Point Impossible Beach varies with wave and tide conditions. Take care if swimming here and watch the deeper tidal channel and currents. Whites Beach is a moderately safe beach close inshore, in lee of the reefs. Watch for rips during higher waves, particularly near the reefs and rocks. Surfing Usually low shorebreaks along the beach. However during big winter swell, many surfers head for Point Impossible, where there are two breaks. These are Insides against the car park and creek, when waves are up to 1.5 m; and Outsides on the outer reef, when waves are higher. Fishing The point and creek mouth are the most popular spots, with the beach tending to be shallow. General A natural beach next to the popular town of Torquay, used by those who want to get away from the more crowded (and clothed) town beaches. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Henderson Falls, the Canyon and Phantom Falls

Henderson Falls, The Canyon & Phantom Falls Car park options - Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark, along Allenvale Rd (21/2 hours return walk to Phantom Falls) - Allenvale Mill site, on Allenvale Road (90 minute return walk to Phantom Falls) Walking track information - Start: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Distance: 6.5 km return - Duration: 21/2 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details Henderson Falls, the Canyon and Phantom Falls are reached from the Sheoak Creek Picnic area, along Allenvale Rd. There are barbecue facilities, toilets, picnic tables, fireplaces and drinking water. From the Canyon, you can return to Sheoak picnic area by the same track or continue on to Phantom Falls and then down to the Allenvale Mill carpark and along Allenvale Rd back to the Sheoak picnic area. On the way is also Won Wondha Falls. Henderson Falls is about 8 to10 meters, Panthom Falls about 15 meters high. The total distance of this circuit is around 9 km.

Kalimna Falls

Car park options - Sheoak picnic area carpark (2.5 hours walk to Lower Falls, 31/2 hours to Upper Falls) Walking track information - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: Lower Falls – 6.5 km; Upper Falls – 8.5 km - Duration: Lower Falls – 21/2 hours: Upper Falls – 31/2 hours - Difficulty: Easy Details The Sheoak picnic area, is a 4km drive from Lorne. The Kalimna falls are fringed by tall rainforest trees and dense tree ferns. The Lower Falls are not large, but you can get behind them and look out through the falling water to the large pool surrounded by mossy logs and rocks. The Upper Falls are a series of cascades viewed from a platform. The walk follows the route of an old tramway and some of the old sleepers can still be seen. The return walk to the picnic area can be made along Garvey track.

Sheoak Falls

Follow well maintained walking tracks and discover the waterfalls in the narrow valleys of the Otway Ranges Car park options - Sheoak picnic area carpark (10 minutes walk to Sheoak Falls) Walking track information - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: 7 km return • Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Moderate Details Head south-east from the Sheoak Picnic Area along Sheoak Creek to Swallow Cave (where swallows nest in the rock crevices in spring) and on for another 400 m to the 15-metre Sheoak Falls (this section of the walk should not be attempted when water levels are high). While not falling for a great distance, the water passes over a dark rock face within a natural amphitheatre, making for spectacular viewing. Return a very short distance towards Swallow Cave then branch off to the left along the Sheoak/Castle Rock Track. After about 1.3 km there is a track junction. Turn left to Castle Rock where there is a lookout then return to the junction. Keep to the left, following the Sheoak Track north to Garveys Track which leads back to the Picnic Area.
 

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High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.
Enjoy table service in elegant surroundings, exquisite food, quality tea and real coffee!

$40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.

Every Sunday from February to November
12pm sailing from Sorrento
3pm sailing from Queenscliff.

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244