Great Ocean Road
TOWN SEARCH
 
Family Picnic
Family at the Beach
Adventure Park 2
Adventure Park
Portarlington Jetty
Kids Train

Family Activities

Stay Connected

Connect

Stay connected with us through Facebook and Twitter. We'll keep you updated with events, information and special offers throughout the region.

Not Now Connect

Families

There are loads of things to do and places to see in the region for families. With so much coastline, well serviced towns, villages and regional centres and a hinterland area that has some of the best attractions in Australia, there are activities to suit every type of family, and family member.

Rockpool rambling and beach activities at any number of the beaches in the region are popular. You can learn to surf, boogie board, paddle in the waves or try skim boarding in the shallows. Build sandcastles, play cricket or just enjoy a picnic or ice cream on the sand, the beach is the perfect place for families to spend some time.

As well as Victoria's biggest theme park Adventure Park at Wallington, there are some fantastic attractions suitable for families. The Otway Fly tree top walk is exhilarating, and the dinosaurs hiding in the forest below are popular with kids. There are mini golf courses, a giant maze, loads of playgrounds and places to swim. Pick your own berry farms, animal sanctuaries and a vintage steam train operate in the region, and many of the museums and heritage attractions have specific programs to keep the kids engaged and entertained - learning by stealth.

Sporting activities are also great for families - horse riding tours in the hinterland, bike riding on designated tracks, swimming or water sports, there are places to do all these things and more.

Highlights

Great Ocean Road Memorial Archway

Built as a tribute to the soldiers from the First World War who were engaged in the construction of the Great Ocean Road, the memorial arch provides a great photographic opportunity for travellers entering Lorne. Alongside the arch is a sculpture also commemorating the returned servicemen, which was commissioned and placed during the 75th anniversary of the road celebrations. There is a carpark alongside this area so visitors can make the most of this photo opportuniy.

The Surf Coast Walk

Whether you're a nature lover or a fun lover, whether you take an hour, a day or a week, the Surf Coast Walk puts a stunning and unique coastal environment within easy reach. - Offering natural beauty and easy access - A world-class walking destination for all to enjoy - On the edge of the stunning Great Ocean Road - Do a section or do it all; at your own pace - More than a walk, over half the track is suitable for bikes Relish the rich ochre of the Bells Beach cliffs, the deep blue of Bass Strait and the leafy green of eucalypt forects. Discover traditional Wathaurung country, fascinating surf culture and abundant wildlife as the walk connects you with the coastal town comforts of Torquay, Anglesea and Aireys Inlet.

Cape Otway Lightstation

Climb to the top of mainland Australia's oldest lighthouse, Cape Otway Lightstation, 90 metres above the wild Southern Ocean, and see why many tragic shipwrecks occurred on this isolated and rugged coastline. Immerse yourself in history with one of Australia's most important and recognisable lighthouses at your doorstep. Spectacular scenery, lighthouse tours, wildlife (koalas, wallabies and whales), rainforests, waterfalls and awesome sunsets will be highlights of your stay. Cape Otway is an excellent location to base yourself, being central to Great Ocean Road and Great Otway National Park activities and walks. Groups of up to 16 people can be accommodated in the heritage Head Lighthouse Keeper's cottage with four bedrooms, two bathrooms, open fires and fully self contained kitchen and laundry facilities. Two night minimum stays. The cottage is a wonderful retreat for families, walking groups or as a unique venue for get-togethers with friends. The Manager's House is a fully self-contained, newly renovated property providing all the comforts of home, comfortably accommodating up to 15 guests. A great location for a house party, or place to relax after walking in the Otways, the Manager's House is filled with natural light. Both properties have bed and breakfast options for smaller groups or couples. The Lightstation also has a delightful café on site which is open daily. Relax over a great coffee and homemade scones, soaking up the views. The café is located in the original Assistant Lighthouse Keeper's cottage, right in front of the lighthouse. Discover the coast on a 4WD Lightkeeper's Shipwreck Discovery Tour, which runs daily and with special offers for accommodation guests. Walk in the footsteps of lightkeepers and pioneers along the Great Ocean Walk with experienced and knowledgeable local guides. Opera in the Otways - Saturday November 17, 2012 - see website for details.

Otway Fly Treetop Adventures

Otway Fly Treetop Adventures - One Location two adventures. Located in Victoria's magnificent Otways providing visitors with a unique opportunity to view the forest from a bird's eye view through its two unique eco-adventure experiences, the famous Tree Top walk and Zip Line tour. The Tree Top Walk - the longest and tallest elevated walk of its kind in the world. At 600 metres long and 30 metres above ground level. A 45 metre high lookout is ascended via a spiral stairway through the under story to emerge amongst the crowns of the giants of the forest, whilst the springboard cantilever bounces precariously high over picturesque Young's Creek. The walk is a 1.9 kilometres round walk starting from the visitor centre and takes approximately 45 minutes to one hour to complete. The walk is full of quality interpretive panels educating our visitor on the forest and surrounds on display. For the thrill seeker Zip lining is the perfect adrenaline fuelled activity where you can Zip across the treetops in this unique forest experience, gaining a bird's-eye view of Otways beautiful forests. The Zip Line tour involves traversing from one platform to another connected by tree platforms called 'cloud stations', and attached so steel cable suspended up to 30 metres above the forest floor. This exciting adventure lasts 3 hours and is unlike any other experience, we recommend pre booking the Zip Line Tour via the Otway Fly Tree Top Adventures website. The visitor centre is home to a licensed cafe which seats up to 100 people. The car-park also provides for Campervans, Caravans and Coaches. Group bookings can be made and need to be booked in advance, guided tours and catering are available for these bookings.

Glow worms in the Otways

The Otways has worms. Glorious little glow worms can be found at sites throughout the Otway National Park after dark. They are generally found in dark, damp places - like soil banks with overhanging ledges, along creek embankments and beside walking tracks. The worms are not actually worms, rather they are the larvae of fly-like insects called fungus gnats. The larvae prey on small insects - as such they produce sticky threads. The glow emitted from their abdomen attracts insects who are then trapped in the sticky threads. Glow worms are shy creatures - torches, loud noises or touching them may disturb the glow worms and case them to 'switch off' their light and retreat into a crack. Glow worms are often found at Melba Gully, and near the Grey River Picnic Area at Kennett River. It's a good idea to take a torch to find your way along the tracks after dark, but avoid shining the light directly at the glow worms.

Surf World Museum

The Surf World Museum in Torquay, Australia’s surfing capital, celebrates the story of surfing. It also charts Australia’s significant contribution to the development of surfing around the world. Through the colourful and exciting permanent displays and temporary exhibitions of important surfing artefacts and memorabilia, the museum commemorates Australia’s fantastic surfing heritage and rich beach culture. An unforgettable experience, Surf World provides the opportunity to immerse yourself in one of Australia’s most popular pastimes. It’s a place where you can experience or relive, surfing’s sense of fun, and marvel at the changes that have taken place over the years. We look forward to welcoming you.

Apollo Bay Fishing

There are loads of great fishing spots in and around Apollo Bay. Try near the harbour, from the beach or just beyond the point towards Marengo. There are also freshwater streams nearby worth a try.

Great Otway National Park

The Great Otway National Park stretches from Torquay through to Princetown and up through the Otways hinterland towards Colac. The park features rugged coastlines, sandy beaches, rock platforms and windswept heathland. In the north, the park features tall forests, ferny gullies, magnificent waterfalls and tranquil lakes. Walking The Great Ocean Walk, stretches 91 kms from the idyllic resort town of Apollo Bay to Glenample Homestead (adjacent to the 12 Apostles). It passes through the National Park and overlooks the Marine National Park. The walk has been designed so that walkers can 'step on and step off' the trail at a number of places, completing short, day or overnight hikes. Horse riding and mountain biking Experience and enjoy the natural environment on horse back or on a mountain bike. A permit is required for horse riders to ride in the National Park and Parks Victoria staff can assist you with this. The formed roads and tracks provide ideal trails for these active endeavours. Picnicking and camping Picnic opportunities abound, with lovely settings at many of the waterfalls as well as Blanket Leaf, Sheoak, Distillery Creek, Moggs Creek, Paradise, Melba Gully, Shelly Beach, Triplet Falls and Blanket Bay to name a few. There are excellent camping opportunities throughout the Parks. Whether you are looking for a family friendly place to park your caravan or a solitary night under the stars there's something to cater to every need. Before you go Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Point Addis Marine National Park

The Point Addis Marine National Park features spectacular scenery with wide sandy beaches, crumbling limestone and sandstone cliffs, rocky platforms and copious small rocky reefs. The coastline is exposed to intense wave action from the southern ocean, a major contributor to the shaping of this rugged coastline. Visitors exploring the marine environment within this park may enjoy exploring the limestone reefs with abundant rockpools filled with marine life. The subtidal waters are recognised as supporting a wide range of fish and algae species as well as seals, dolphins, brilliantly coloured sponge gardens and extensive rhodolith beds. Offshore, and often difficult to access due to tides and swell, Ingoldsby Reef is a particularly popular destination for divers to explore and search for such creatures. Aboriginal Traditional Owners Parks Victoria acknowledges the Aboriginal Traditional Owners of Victoria - including its parks and reserves. Through their cultural traditions, Aboriginal people maintain their connection to their ancestral lands and waters. Indigenous tradition indicates that this park is part of the Country of the Wathaurong people and that Indigenous people have a long association with this region. Before you go Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Split Point Lighthouse Tours Aireys Inlet

You'll spot her as you travel the Great Ocean Road. To locals and fans afar she is affectionately known as 'The White Queen'. Don't just wonder as you drive by - yes, you can join a guided tour, which will take about 45 minutes of your time. The knowledgeable tour guide will introduce you to a life of maritime responsibility, engineering perfection, a pristine Marine Sanctuary, cultural connections, the famous setting for the TV series 'Round the Twist' and ever-changing 360 degree coastal vistas. Whether you want to step back in maritime, forward in coastal conservation or capture the now with a perfect snapshot, this is a stop worth every minute. The Split Point Lighthouse was built in 1891 and has only been open for tours for eighteen months. She still shines her guiding light every evening to keep ships passing on their way to and from Port Phillip Bay, off the rocky shores. The staff at Split Point Lighthouse Tours look forward to guiding you up the cast iron spiral staircase, through the lantern room and out onto the balcony to enjoy a birds-eye view of the dramatic coastline.

Koala and wildlife Spotting

The coastal bushland between Lorne and Apollo Bay is home to a large population of koalas. A short drive up Grey River Road is usually rewarded with a sighting and, as soon as you’ve spotted one, you’ll be an expert spotter! During cooler months whales are often spotted offshore as they migrate from Antarctica or use the sheltered beaches in the region to deliver and nurse calves. A nocturnal visit to the Kennett River picnic ground will also reveal tiny but glorious glow worms.

Lake Elizabeth

Magically secluded and breathtakingly beautiful, Lake Elizabeth offers several walks of varying lengths and is home to a large variety of waterbirds and platypus. The tranquil lake was created by a massive landslide in 1952 and is perfect for walks, picnics and a dawn or dusk canoe tour to see the platypus.

Learn to Surf

What better place to learn to surf than in the birthplace of Australian surfing? There are several licensed tour operators and qualified instructors who run learn to surf classes on beaches close to Torquay. Catering for individuals or groups, often equipment hire and transport can be included in the price.

Whale watching

Whales have long known what we humans are just coming to realise – the Great Ocean Road is a wonderful spot for a winter break. Sightings are most common during June, July and August, though whales have been spotted as early as February and as late as November. On the migration from Antarctica – humpback whales pass Lorne en route to Queensland and southern right whales spend time on the sheltered Victorian coast to breed and raise calves. To help land-based visitors make the most of this special time, a range of ‘Whale Watch’ initiatives are in place to provide notifications when whales have been spotted off the coast. At Lorne, Wye River, Onion Bay and Apollo Bay, dedicated whale-sighting flags will be hoisted when a verified spotting of one or more of the massive creatures has been spotted nearby, letting people know to cast their eyes to sea for a chance at seeing them too. The ‘Whale Watch’ blog on this site has a diary of confirmed sightings with times, locations, numbers and, where possible, breed of whale. Members of the public can use the blog to report a sighting in the region. ‘Whale Watch’ has hundreds of separate whale sightings reported each year, sometimes with up to six whales in a pod.

Whale Watching around Lorne

Whales have long known what we humans are just coming to realise – the Great Ocean Road is a wonderful spot for a winter break. Sightings are most common during June, July and August, though whales have been spotted as early as February and as late as November. On the migration from Antarctica – humpback whales pass Lorne en route to Queensland and southern right whales spend time on the sheltered Victorian coast to breed and raise calves. To help land-based visitors make the most of this special time, a range of ‘Whale Watch’ initiatives are in place to provide notifications when whales have been spotted off the coast. At Lorne, Wye River, Onion Bay and Apollo Bay, dedicated whale-sighting flags will be hoisted when a verified spotting of one or more of the massive creatures has been spotted nearby, letting people know to cast their eyes to sea for a chance at seeing them too. The ‘Whale Watch’ blog on this site has a diary of confirmed sightings with times, locations, numbers and, where possible, breed of whale. Members of the public can use the blog to report a sighting in the region. ‘Whale Watch’ has hundreds of separate whale sightings reported each year, sometimes with up to six whales in a pod.

Otways Forest, Walks & Waterfalls Tours

Beginning in Skenes Creek, the Otway Forests, Walks and Waterfalls tour heads inland toward Turtons Track, a winding stretch of road that looks like it was built for a sports car commercial. Stop at Beech Forest for a coffee before continuing to the Otway Fly and cascading Triplet Falls. Back on the road, head towards the Cape Otway Lightstation. Between May and October keep a lookout for koalas and whales. Back on the road heading toward Apollo Bay, stop at Maits Rest and follow the wooden boardwalk through an ancient forest to a 300 year old Myrtle Beech tree. Finish in Apollo Bay, perhaps with some fresh local fish and a glass of wine. Further details and maps for the Otway Forests, Walks and Waterfalls Tour are available at local visitor information centres.

Gentle Annie Berry Gardens

Nestled in the picturesque Pennyroyal Valley near Deans Marsh; Gentle Annie Berry Gardens look forward to welcoming you and your family to their berry farm. Spend time wandering the farm picking a variety of berries and orchard fruit, or simply drop in for a coffee and piece of cake, Devonshire tea, lunch or afternoon tea in the licensed cafe. Gluten free and dairy free offered on menu. When possible Gentle Annie choose to use organic produce and products. Our suppliers are local including the wines, beers and ciders. In the produce shop you will find a variety of Gentle Annie's jams, chutney's, sorbets and a selection of local produce.

Surfworld Museum Torquay

The Surfworld Museum Torquay celebrates the history of surfing in Australia. It tells the story of this countries rich beach culture and surfing heritage that has developed over the last one hundred years. A visit to Surfworld gives people the opportunity to immerse themselves in beach experience and explore one of Australia's favourite past times. Through themed exhibition spaces and interactive displays, visitors can relive time spent at the beach, or discover the intimate link between surfers and the breaking waves. Find out about surfing hero's and legends in The Australian Surfing Hall Of Fame, which celebrates the lives of Australian surfing champions. You can check out their biographies mounted on a typical example of the board they rode. Relax in the theatre and enjoy spectacular footage of surfers in action while you are surrounded by vintage surf memorabilia and an epic array of historic surfboards. Trace the development of the surfboard along the boardwalk as a breaking wave looms overhead. Explore the many elements that go to make up surf culture, clothes, movies, music, and walk through the ultimate surf mobile, the VW kombi van. Whether you are eight or eighty eight, at the Surfworld Museum Torquay you can ride a wave of history and discover how awesome and inspirational surfing can be. For updates or further information please check their website.

Aireys Inlet Horse Riding

Ride along pristine beaches and take in some of Australia's most beautiful coastal scenery. Sunset rides are particularly special. Enjoy the exhilarating feeling of galloping along the sand with the wind in your hair or ride along coastal cliff tops in beautiful bushland settings. Local trail riding company Blazing Saddles offers guided and instructional tours if you can’t BYO horse.

Anglesea Art Walk

Spanning 2.5 kilometres and featuring six mosaic art pieces, the Anglesea Art Walk highlights the history and unique flora and fauna of this extraordinary place. It starts at the JE Loveridge lookout with sensational panoramic views of the Surf Coast and concludes in the valley at the Anglesea Primary School.

Anglesea Riverbank

A series of flowing channels connected by bike paths and bridges make Anglesea River a popular destination for activities such as fishing from one of the many platforms, canoeing, windsurfing, sailing or hiring a paddle boat. The wide river is ideal for numerous activities to suit all ages. The many bbq’s and tables along the riverbank also make it an ideal picnic area. The river and its surroundings is also an important habitat for native wildlife including owls, possums, echidnas, kangaroo and wallabies, as well as native fish, eels and many species of waterbird.

Coogarah Park

Popular with families for its shipwreck playground, BBQ facilities and picnic areas, Coogarah Park set on the riverbank just a couple of minutes from the centre of town provides the children with hours of entertainment. There are also walking tracks and a skate park in the grounds.

point-danger-marine-sanctuary

Located in Torquay, one of Victoria's favourite seaside towns, the reef is ideal for snorkelling and exploring the diverse marine life at low tide. The area between Torquay's back and front beaches is formed of beds of crumbling limestone and a narrow rock platform which extends to the west. A small reef which is only exposed at the lowest of summer tides lies just offshore and is often isolated from the beach by a deep sandy channel. One shipwreck is found within the park, the Joseph H. Scammell. The limestone reef is an enthralling feature of this park. Covered in small boulders and intricate seaweed beds, the reef is home to a number of weird and wonderful creatures. Most noteworthy is the huge diversity of seaslugs, currently 96 species known to occur in this sanctuary, many of which are endemic. These fascinating creatures can be any colour of the rainbow and come in a range of exquisite shapes and sizes. Also present are carnivorous worms, delicate brittle stars and majestic eagle rays. See if you can spot a Fairy Tern, a rare and endangered bird which uses habitats in Point Danger Marine Sanctuary for feeding and roosting. Before you go, note that conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.

Bimbi Park Trail Rides

Horse rides at Bimbi Park cater for all ages and levels of ability. Rides are carefully graded, there are experienced horses, qualified instructors, safe trails and approved safety helmets. The sandy soil of the region makes for good riding even after rain. Trail rides in the Otway's are exciting affairs. You can ride along marvellous beaches where the wild windswept waves of the Southern Ocean form an exhilarating background. You can amble through lush expanses of forest and long the cliff tops at sunset. Rides also take you to Cape Otway Lighthouse, scenic lookouts and some of the pretty bays that dot the Otway coastline. - All rides are strictly programmed and led by an accredited leader - Rides are graded - Suitable footwear is required - Helmets supplied and compulsory - No personal acceptance of responsibility - NO RIDE

Blazing Saddles Trail Rides

Blazing Saddles Horse Trail Rides offers the best beach and bush rides in Victoria. They have a variety of horses from Arabs, Appaloosas, Stock horses and Clydesdale cross horses that will suit all types of riders. Open every day and ride in most weather conditions. No need to worry about helmets, boots and jackets, all you need is a pair of long pants and the rest is supplied. The beginner ride is one hour and fifteen minutes and has some of the most amazing views along the coast. If you have done a couple of rides Blazing Saddles Trail Rides also offer a learn to canter ride, a great opportunity to expand on those basics, or you can choose to do two hour and fifteen minute bush ride which is for those who fancy a lot more action. Last but not least is the beach ride, it is two and a half hours long and is along five kilometres of Fairhaven beach coastline, which is one of the most pristine beaches in Victoria. Other activities include kids holiday clinics, lessons and pony rides. Also on offer is a cafe for anyone not really into the horses, freshly brewed coffee and home made cakes are the specialty. The guides are all fantastic and will help you out to make riding a more relaxed experience for those who are nervous and for those who 'want to go for it' they'll make sure you won't forget it. Blazing Saddles Trail Rides is Eco-accredited and offer you a special bush experience in the stunning Great Otway National Park, with an occasional sighting of a kangaroo, koala or echidna to top off the experience. Just a day drive from Melbourne or a nice drop in on the way to Adelaide or the Twelve Apostles.
Spring Creek Horse Riding
Near Anglesea

Spring Creek Horse Riding

Nestled in the beautiful Spring Creek Valley, experience spectacular riding through the unique bushlands of the Great Otway National Park with Spring Creek Horse Riding. Trail rides to suit beginners and experienced riders. Spring Creek Horse Riding is only ten minutes drive from Torquay and Anglesea. Offering one to two hour rides. Full day rides are also available. Booking is essential to avoid disappointment. Please visit the Spring Creek Horse Riding website for details.

Anglesea Beach

Anglesea Beach lies next to the mouth of the Anglesea River and fronts the town of Anglesea. The beach is 400 m long and curves in a south to south-east facing arc between the usually closed river mouth and the eroding rocks and cliffs in front of the bluff-top Anglesea Surf Life Saving Club. Access and parking are available at the river mouth, off the Great Ocean Road, and at the surf club. The beach receives waves averaging 1 m. The larger ocean waves are reduced as they refract around Point Roadknight. They produce a wide, shallow, single bar, which is usually attached to the beach south of the surf lifesaving club. It is increasingly cut by rips toward the river mouth. The Anglesea Surf Life Saving Club was formed in 1952 and annually averages 12 rescues. Swimming A moderately safe beach under typical summer conditions, however avoid the rip against the southern rocks. Best at high tide as waves tend to dump at low tide. Stay on the bar and in the patrolled area. Surfing Popular with the less experienced surfers who use the wide, gently sloping surf zone. Fishing Beach fishing is best at the river mouth where rip holes are more prevalent. General A popular summer beach, offering good parking and access, and a moderately safe patrolled beach. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Anglesea Point Roadknight Beach

Point Roadknight is a narrow ridge of dune calcarenite that parallels the adjoining Urquhart Bluff Beach. The point and its reef protrude 500 m to the east and afford considerable protection to the beach. The beach is 700 m long and faces north-east. It lies between the slippery Soapy Rocks and the point. Beware of the slippery rocks which are a hazard to walk on. There is road access to the back of the beach, a large car park, a boat ramp and a yacht club. Waves reaching the beach average less than 1 m, which results in a continuous, attached bar and usually no rips. Swimming This is the safest beach in the Anglesea region and is also patrolled daily by lifeguards during the Christmas holiday period. Surfing Usually too small to bother about. Fishing Better off the point than the beach. General A popular summer beach for those who want lower waves and the added safety of a patrolled beach. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Anglesea Walks

With a variety of bush, coast and heathland to be explored in the area, Anglesea is a fantastic place to put on your walking shoes. Enjoy a pleasant 20 minute stroll from Main Beach to Pt Roadknight or do the Point Addis Koorie Cultural Walk to see some amazing birdlife including finches and parrots and some very pretty wildflowers in the spring and early summer. Visit the Surf Coast Walk page for more walking tracks: www.surfcoastwalks.com.au. For a more in-depth and educational experience, why not take a guided walk with a local tour company? They will offer insight into the history and ecology of the local area that for an experience that enriches your mind as much as your body.

Apollo Bay Foreshore

The sheltered, sandy Apollo Bay main beach is a great place to swim or bodysurf. Just behind the sand dunes, the Apollo Bay foreshore area has a terrific playground, skate park, lots of open space for games and picnic and BBQ facilities. Right opposite the main street food outlets and ice-creameries, it’s perfect for grabbing an al fresco bite to eat.

Apollo Bay Walks

MARRINERS FALLS WALK An easy to moderate, 40-minute return walk. Located at the end of the Barham River Road, with a large car park. You will cross over large stepping stones at 4 creek crossings and view Magnificent tree ferns, lichens and mosses, with a close view of the falls. Dogs on lead. Note: Track is subject to flooding at times, take care after rain. MAITS REST RAINFOREST WALK The walk at Maits Rest is a great introduction to Victoria's tall wet eucalypt forests and rainforests. The forest walk has sections of raised boardwalk, compacted soil and aggregate. Some steep sections lack handrails. There are excellent interpretive signs along the path. Vehicle access to this site is excellent, and the area around the car park is free of obstacles. There are no picnic or toilet facilities. The closest are at Apollo Bay or the Aire River Camping area. SHELLY BEACH CIRCUIT WALK This is one of the best short walks on the Great Ocean Walk. The track traverses through fern gullies, coastal scrub, along Shelly Beach and across rocky platforms to Elliot River. Return through a majestic stand of blue gums, inhabited by koalas and nocturnal Yellow-bellied Gliders. THREE CREEKS CIRCUIT WALK A moderate walk that features coastal forests, sea views, beaches and rock platforms. Start at the Shelley Beach Picnic Area car park and descend to Shelley Beach. Turn left at the Three Creeks junction and walk through coastal scrub with views over the ocean. The small beach is the western end of a larger beach just around the rocks. Note: only attempt the coastal return leg if the tide is low and the seas are calm. ELLIOT RIVER CIRCUIT WALK A moderate walk that features river, forest and ferns. From the carpark follow the Elliot River Track down to the mouth of the river crossing on stepping stones. Climb up the ridge into Blue Gum and Wet Forest. Return via the Management Vehicle Track and road. Note: only attempt the coastal leg if the tide is low and seas are calm. AIRE RIVER ESCARPMENT LOOKOUT Starting from the Aire bridge, discover the peaceful estuarine waters of Aire River, the Hordenvale Wetlands and the impressive view from the Escarpment Lookout over the ocean and wetlands on this moderate walk. Keep an eye out for kangaroos and wallabies in the coastal scrub. KATABANUT CIRCUIT WALK From the north east end of the main Blanket Bay campground the track climbs steeply through foothill forests with a dense understorey of banksia's and small shrubs. The track turns right down over the Blanket Bay creek into a damp environment. Continue to the right descending onto the beach and returning to the campground. PARKER FOREST CIRCUIT WALK From the Parker Hill campground, following the cliff tops to Point Franklin. Watch along the coast as the Cape Otway Lightstation emerges. Step onto the beach but keep a watchful eye out for the Hooded Plovers which need a wide berth. Stringybark Track will bring you back past Koala habitat to your starting point. LIGHTHOUSE CEMETERY AND LOOKOUT WALK From the Cape Otway Lightstation car park, this easy walk leads walkers through the Beard Heath to a lookout point with views across to the lighthouse, telegraph station and the ocean. Visit the historic cemetery which bears witness to the harsh times of early lightstation life. GLORIOUS LOOKOUTS The lookouts close to Apollo Bay provide magnificent views of the countryside and ocean. These are a few that should not be missed: • Cape Patton Lookout: Great Ocean Rd, east of Apollo Bay • Crows Nest Lookout: Tuxion Rd, Apollo Bay • Marriners: Marriners Lookout Rd, Apollo Bay • The Gable: Moonlight Head Rd, Wattle Hill • West Barwon Reservoir: Apollo Bay Forrest Rd, Barramunga • Wongarra: Sunnyside Road, Wongarra

Apollo Bay Waterfalls

TRIPLET FALLS & HERITAGE TRAIL Triplet Falls is one of the iconic visitor sites in the Great Otway National Park and it has recently been reopened to visitors after a two million dollar redevelopment. This beautiful waterfall, set amongst tall mountain ash, blackwoods, myrtle beech and towering ferns, now has a new two kilometre loop walk with raised boardwalks and viewing platforms. This takes visitors into previously unexplored parts of this ancient forest and provides new and unique views into the lower cascades and the majestic main falls. A small picnic area is also available for visitors to relax and enjoy the beautiful surrounds. BEAUCHAMP FALLS WALK A moderate 1.5-hour return walk from the picnic area. The walk passes through magnificent mountain ash forests, with large myrtle beech, blackwood and thick ferns. The track becomes steep before opening to the spectacle of the falls crashing over a ledge into a large pool. Dogs on lead. Located off the Aire Valley Road from Beech Forest Road. HOPETOUN FALLS A 30-minute return moderate walk to the falls. The path is steep to the valley floor where it passes through a glade of tree ferns to the foot of the falls. Alternatively, a viewing platform at the car park offers a view of the roaring water as it pounds into the Aire River. The Aire Valley is a short distance south, offering a beautiful area with a backdrop of towering Californian Redwoods. Dogs on lead. Located 26 kilometres east of Lavers Hill off Aire Valley Road.
Bancoora Beach
Near Torquay

Bancoora Beach

Bancoora Beach is a 1 km long, south-east facing beach located between low, basaltic, rocky points and reefs, and backed by a natural, vegetated foredune. The Bancoora Surf Life Saving Club and car park are located behind the foredune, leaving the beach in an attractive natural state. The beach receives waves averaging 1.3 m, which usually cut three rips across the 80 m wide single bar and surf zone. Higher waves intensify the rips, with strong permanent rips running out against the rocks at each end. On average, 10 people are rescued here each year. Swimming An attractive, moderately safe, patrolled beach, particularly during lower summer swell. Stay on the bars in the patrolled area, and avoid the strong rips near the rocks. Surfing Usually a low to moderate beach break, with a right hand point break out on the southern point during higher swell. Fishing Popular in summer with the campers. Offers both beach fishing with some rip holes and rock fishing off the points. General An out of the way, relatively natural beach, more popular in summer when the nearby caravan park is full and the beach is patrolled. It is only used by surfers in winter. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Colac Botanic Gardens

On the Lake Colac foreshore, the Botanic Gardens were redesigned by William Guilfoyle in 1910. The slope facing the lake was terraced to provide viewing for events such as rowing regattas, while the original caretakers cottage now houses a café and gallery. This is only one of two drive-through botanic gardens in Victoria.

Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary

At the base of the Split Point Lighthouse, the 17 hectare Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary is home to a huge variety of marine life. Popular with snorkellers and scuba divers, you can expect to see a diverse range of invertebrates. The rockpools around the sandy coves in this area are also teeming with marine life and are terrific for families to explore.

Fairhaven Beach

Six kilometre long Fairhaven Beach is the longest beach on the Great Ocean Road, from which it is readily accessible, as the road backs the entire beach. The beach runs due west from the mouth of Moggs Creek for 4 km, before slowly curving around to face east at the western Cinema Point. The southerly aspect exposes the beach to waves averaging 1.5 m, which combine with the fine to medium beach sand to produce a 200 m wide surf zone containing two bars. The inner bar is cut by rips every 300 m, resulting in up to 20 rips along the beach. The outer bar, which only breaks in higher waves, has more widely spaced rips, when it is active. The Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1957, is located toward the eastern end of the beach, and its members annually average 10 rescues. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, with usually moderate waves and persistent and often strong rips. Westerly winds intensify longshore and rip currents. Stay in the patrolled area on the attached inner bar. Surfing The beach has numerous beach breaks and usually a good swell. However, it is exposed and works best with northerly winds. Some well-known spots along the beach include the mouth of Moggs Creek, where low summer lefts can be found; The Spot, a reef break just east of the surf lifesaving club; and further down at Eastern View and Spouts Creek. Fishing The good access and numerous rips and holes make this a popular, although usually uncrowded, spot for beach fishing. The mouths of Moggs and Spout Creeks are also popular, when they are flowing. General A long, natural beach more suited to experienced bathers and surfers, with the patrolled area in front of the surf club offering the safest bathing area. Toward the western end of the beach is a Memorial Arch commemorating the construction of the Great Ocean Road during the depression years of the 1930s. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Apollo Bay Harbour

The Apollo Bay Fishing Fleet is moored at the harbour, sheltered by a large breakwater. As a working harbour it is an interesting site to wander through and see the professional fishermen either unloading their catch or preparing to depart on another voyage to sea. Apollo Bay is renowned for crayfish, and the stacks of lobster pots stacked up on the wharves make an interesting spectacle. The daily catch is available fresh from the boat at the local fishermens cooperative.

Jan Juc Beach

Jan Juc Beach is located immediately south of Torquay and is a little more exposed, receiving waves averaging 1.4 m. It extends for 1.2 km between Rocky Point and Bird Rock and faces almost due south, resulting in larger waves. The waves combine with the fine to medium sand to produce a single bar cut by three to four rips, with permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The northern half of the beach is backed by low bluffs, partly covered by dunes. The surf lifesaving club, parking and access, together with Jan Juc Creek, are in the centre, while the narrow, southern half of the beach is backed by 20 m high cliffs. The Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club was founded in 1963 and annually rescues an average of 30 people. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, owing to the high waves and persistent rips. More suitable for experienced bathers and surfers. Stay between the flags and away from the rips and rocks. Surfing Usually variable beach breaks, however Bird Rock can provide excellent rights with a moderate swell and high tide. Fishing Best toward the northern end where rip holes are more persistent. General Jan Juc is Torquay's second and more exposed surfing beach. Still popular in summer for those escaping the Torquay crowds, however the variable beach and surf conditions warrant extra care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Lorne Beach and Foreshore

The wide ribbon of sand and gentle waves make Lorne Beach on Loutit Bay a perfect spot for swimmers, surfers and frolickers alike. The sand is only a short stroll from Mountjoy Parade, there are shower and toilet facilities and the beach is patrolled in Summer. In the foreshore reserve area there is a children’s playground, swimming pool, skate park, trampoline hire and lots of open space for games and picnics.

Lorne Rides

Lorne has four set rides. Ratings range from easy, for all ages on the flat, to hard in the steep hilly sections. With times from 30 minutes to three hours, and optional extensions, the rides cover the town, coast, bush and Erskine Falls. The hills around Lorne provide a bit of a challenge, but you can enjoy a leisurely cycle around the main street and down to the pier. If you like a bit of a challenge, the Forests and Flowers Mountain Bike Ride is a moderate to hard circuit of 35km, with plenty of scenic rewards. The ride starts at the Lorne Visitor Information Centre with an almost 9km climb through the forest in its first section. Highlights include Erskine Falls and giant tree ferns. The second, less-taxing section, follows the Benwerrin-Mt Sabine Road through the tall Otways forest. The final section is downhill run along Deans Marsh Road back to Lorne.

Lorne Shopping

Mountjoy Parade is the main strip in Lorne, and is a great place for shopping with a view – the street overlooks Loutit Bay. There are loads of specialty stores, fashion boutiques, giftware, souvenirs as well as the pharmacy, post office and other services.

Lorne Walks & Waterfalls

The Great Otway National Park is a spectacular area of native forest, and there are plenty of opportunities to get closer to nature with walking tracks and trails in the area, many leading to spectacular crashing waterfalls. There are seven waterfalls within the bushland surrounding Lorne, with different accessibility levels – some are a quick ten minute stroll from the carpark, others are a more strenuous rainforest hike rewarded with the majestic roar of a waterfall. CORA LYNN CASCADES Car park options: - Blanket Leaf picnic ground carpark (4 km return walk to the falls) - Cora Lynn Cascades carpark (7 km return walk to the falls) - Allenvale Mill carpark (8 km return walk to the falls) Walking track information: - Start: Blanket Leaf picnic ground, off Erskine Falls Road - Finish: Allenvale Mill car park - Distance: 4 km return to Cora Lynn cascades, 12 km return to Allenvale Mill - Duration: 2 hours to Cora Lynn cascades, 5 1/2 hours to Allenvale Mill - Difficulty: Moderate (to Cora Lynn cascades), Strenuous (to Allenvale Mill) Details: The Cora Lynn Cascades walk passes through fern gullies and rocky gorges to Cora Lynn Cascades (about 2 km from the picnic area). The next section (from the Cascades to the Cora Lynn carpark) is only for experienced walkers. From the carpark the track continues on to Phantom Falls to Allenvale Road. From here you can walk east along Allenvale Road then turn left onto the Green Break Track which joins up with Erskine Falls Road which leads back to the picnic area. Another option is to follow Saint George River from the Allenvale Mill site to the coast. ERSKINE FALLS & STRAW FALLS Car park options: - Erskine Falls car park (300m return walk to falls 1st lookout, 700 m to 2nd lookout) Walking track information (Erskine River Track): - Start: Erskine Falls car park - Finish: Lorne - Distance: 7.5 km one way - Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: Erskine Falls is a short drive out of Lorne on appropriately named Erskine Falls Road. It is one of the most popular falls in the Otways and easily accessible. A five-minute walk from the car park brings you to a lookout of the falls, cascading 30 metres into a beautiful tree fern gullyYou also can take steps down to the Erskine River to view the falls from below. . Straw Falls are a 15m cascade on the Erskine River and are a further 400m downstreams of Erskine Falls. Experienced walkers can follow the river from Erksine Falls to Lorne. The 7.5km one-way walk takes about three hours and passes Straw Falls and Splitter Falls. It should not be attempted when water levels are high. HENDERSON FALLS, THE CANYON & PHANTOM FALLS Car park options: - Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark, along Allenvale Rd (21/2 hours return walk to Phantom Falls) - Allenvale Mill site, on Allenvale Road (90 minute return walk to Phantom Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak Creek Picnic area carpark - Distance: 6.5 km return - Duration: 21/2 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: Henderson Falls, the Canyon and Phantom Falls are reached from the Sheoak Creek Picnic area, along Allenvale Rd. There are barbecue facilities, toilets, picnic tables, fireplaces and drinking water. From the Canyon, you can return to Sheoak picnic area by the same track or continue on to Phantom Falls and then down to the Allenvale Mill carpark and along Allenvale Rd back to the Sheoak picnic area. On the way is also Won Wondha Falls. Henderson Falls is about 8 to10 meters, Panthom Falls about 15 meters high. The total distance of this circuit is around 9 km. KALIMNA FALLS (UPPER & LOWER FALLS) Car park options: - Sheoak picnic area carpark (2.5 hours walk to Lower Falls, 31/2 hours to Upper Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: Lower Falls – 6.5 km; Upper Falls – 8.5 km - Duration: Lower Falls – 21/2 hours: Upper Falls – 31/2 hours - Difficulty: Easy Details: The Sheoak picnic area, is a 4km drive from Lorne. The Kalimna falls are fringed by tall rainforest trees and dense tree ferns. The Lower Falls are not large, but you can get behind them and look out through the falling water to the large pool surrounded by mossy logs and rocks. The Upper Falls are a series of cascades viewed from a platform. The walk follows the route of an old tramway and some of the old sleepers can still be seen. The return walk to the picnic area can be made along Garvey track. SHEOAK FALLS Car park options: - Sheoak picnic area carpark (10 minutes walk to Sheoak Falls) Walking track information: - Start: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Finish: Sheoak picnic area carpark - Distance: 7 km return • Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Moderate Details: Head south-east from the Sheoak Picnic Area along Sheoak Creek to Swallow Cave (where swallows nest in the rock crevices in spring) and on for another 400 m to the 15-metre Sheoak Falls (this section of the walk should not be attempted when water levels are high). While not falling for a great distance, the water passes over a dark rock face within a natural amphitheatre, making for spectacular viewing. Return a very short distance towards Swallow Cave then branch off to the left along the Sheoak/Castle Rock Track. After about 1.3 km there is a track junction. Turn left to Castle Rock where there is a lookout then return to the junction. Keep to the left, following the Sheoak Track north to Garveys Track which leads back to the Picnic Area. CUMBERLAND FALLS Car park options: - Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River (3 hours walk return) - Sheoak picnic area carpark Walking track information: - Start: Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River - Finish: Picnic area carpark at the mouth of the Cumberland River - Distance: 9 km return - Duration: 4.5 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: About 6 km south of Lorne along the Great Ocean Road is a picnic area at the mouth of the Cumberland River. You can take the Cumberland Falls Walk by following the river for about 3 km past some excellent clifftop scenery to the Cumberland Cascades (not to be attempted when the river level is high). Return the way you came for nearly 1 km but then take the track on the left which follows a ridge north to Garveys Track. Turn right onto the latter but turn right again almost immediately onto the Sheoak Track to Castle Rock. From Castle Rock return along the track for a couple of hundred metres to the track junction and turn right. The track leads to Sheoak Falls then on to the Great Ocean Road carpark which can be followed back to the Cumberland River Reserve. CURRAWONG FALLS (AIREYS INLET) Car park options: - Lower carpark, Distillery Creek picnic area (near Aireys Inlet) Walking track information: - Start: Distillery Creek picnic area carpark - Finish: Distillery Creek picnic area carpark - Distance: 12 km return - Duration: 4 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details: The Currawong Falls are at their best in the winter and spring and the site offers fine views of the surrounding countryside. The walk reveals a fascinating range of habitats: ironbark and other eucalypt forests, melaleuca swamps, fern gullies, sheoak stands on high ridges with panoramic views, and steep-sided gorges.

Marriners Lookout

Marriners Lookout is located atop a hill on the Norther outskirts of Apollo Bay. An easy 10 minute walk from the carpark is rewarded with spectacular ocean, beach, hinterland and town views. If you're feeling more energeticm walk about 1.5 kms north from Apollo Bay along the beach or Great Ocean Road, then climb a steep hill along a surfaced road for another 1.5 km to the lookout track. This is also a popular take-off point for hang gliders, so with the right conditions you may see someone take off.

Old Beechy Trail

Running between Colac and Beech Forest, the trail traverses an railway line, rainforest, creeks, streams and open farmland. The 45km track is surfaced with gravel and some dirt road/heavy gravel in shorter sections. A word of advice that may influence your travel direction – Gellibrand is the lowest point and Beech Forest one of the highest.

Painkalac Creek Playground

The Painkalac Creek playground is set in a picturesque location, with views to the Split Point Lighthouse. This reserve adjoins Aireys Inlet Skate Park and is ideal for a family picnic or BBQ. There is plenty of open space for game of cricket, a kick of the footy or flying kites. Aireys Inlet has two other playgrounds located at the Community Centre and the Bark Hut Reserve.

Red Rock

The Red Rock lookout, 12 km from Colac, is one of Australia’s youngest volcanoes. Forty separate eruption points have been found, and many of the craters are now full of water. The area is the third largest volcanic plain in the world and estimated to be 8,000 years old. The volcanic complex consists of overlapping maars, scoria cones and small lava flows. From the lookout, the magnificent 360 degree views include the topography of the volcanic plain and the 25,000 hectare Lake Corangamite.

Split Point Lighthouse

The Split Point Lighthouse dominates the Aireys Inlet landscape, its 34 metre high tower and typical red cap visible for miles. The still operating lighthouse is open to the public with guided tours available and sweeping views of the Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary and Great Ocean Road region below. The grounds surrounding the lighthouse include a replica of the ‘bark hut’ early settlers in Aireys Inlet would have lived in, and the beach at the base of the lighthouse has great rockpools to explore.

Sundial of Human Involvement

Picturesquely located on the foreshore land at Fishermans Beach at the corner of Darian Road and The Esplanade, the sundial was assembled in the traditional and time-honoured method of mosaic and comprises more than 120,000 glass Tesserae tiles. The sundial represents the traditional dreaming stories of the indigenous Wathaurong people. Your body becomes the ‘dial’ on this unique piece of art. Stand in the centre of the design and you can tell the time by the shadow cast by your body.

Cycle Torquay

Cycling is a great way to explore the gorgeous coastal and hinterland scenery around Torquay. There are terrific road rides for serious and recreational riders, as well as off road trails to suit mountain bikers or family groups.

Torquay Fishermans Beach

Fishermans Beach, as the name suggests, is a low energy beach traditionally used to launch fishing boats. This is still true today with a boat ramp on the beach, as well as sailing, yacht, and motor boat clubs all located behind the western end of the beach. The beach lies in Zeally Bay and runs south-west for 1 km from the mouth of the small Deep Creek, then south to the 10 m high limestone bluffs at Yellow Bluff. The entire beach is backed by a foreshore reserve and The Esplanade. It has parking areas and other facilities. Swimming A relatively safe beach with a wide, shallow bar and usually no rips. Stay clear of the boating activity near the ramp and boat clubs. Surfing Usually a low shorebreak. Big winter swells do however break over the shallow reefs and bars to produce reasonable waves, when everything else is closed out. Fishing Best off Yellow Bluff at high tide where you can reach the reef. At low tide, shallow water and exposed reefs dominate. General This is Torquay's most protected beach and is very popular in summer with those who are looking for quieter surf conditions. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Front Beach

Torquay's Front Beach fronts the town centre. It is a well-appointed beach with a well-maintained foreshore reserve between The Esplanade and the beach. There are numerous facilities in the reserve, including a tourist information centre. A seawall and a row of tall Norfolk Island pines back the beach, and several wooden groynes cross the beach. The beach faces due east and runs for 1 km from Yellow Bluff to Point Danger. The point and its reefs protect the beach, which receives waves averaging less than 1 m. These maintain a shallow, continuous, attached bar. Swimming This is Torquay's most popular family beach, with usually low waves, a shallow bar and no rips, plus the added safety of a summer lifeguard patrol. Surfing Usually a low beach break used by learners. During big swell, waves can make it around Point Danger to break as right handers off Front Beach. Fishing The best location is on Point Danger. However, watch the waves and tides, as it is awash at high tide. General Torquay's showpiece beach with good access, facilities, a lifeguard and usually low, safe surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Surf (Back) Beach

Torquay is the 'Surfing Capital of Australia'. Torquay Beach was the site of the first malibu board demonstration in Australia, back in 1956. Today Torquay is more important for being the closest town to the famous Bells Beach, and the stepping-off point for a number of surfing locations along the Great Ocean Road. The Torquay Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1945, has also hosted state, national and international surf lifesaving carnivals. More recently, a number of major surfing companies and an excellent Surf World exhibition have been located at Torquay's Surf Coast Plaza. Torquay Beach is 800 m long and faces south-east, with some protection provided toward the southern end by Rocky Point. Extensive intertidal rock reefs lie off Point Danger at the northern end, and Spring Creek drains across the beach just west of the surf club. Waves average 1.2 m and usually cut three rips across the single bar, with additional permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The southern rip, known as the ‘Escalator’ is particularly strong during easterly conditions. The beach itself is moderately steep and is backed by extensive parking areas, particularly along the eastern half. Swimming A very popular summer beach bolstered by its name, good accessibility and surf lifesaving club. The beach is moderately safe on the bars in the patrolled areas, however avoid the rocks and strong rips, particularly toward Point Danger as, on average, 27 people are rescued here each year. Surfing The site of the first short board riding in Australia and still a very popular, if crowded, location year round. The beach offers a wide beach break, which is moderately protected during westerlies, though best in a north-westerly, with a left hander off Point Danger. Fishing Both beach and rock fishing are available, with the best rip holes toward the northern end. Take care on the rocks, as they are awash at high tide. General One of Victoria's best known and most popular summer surfing beaches. The adjacent town offers all facilities, while the patrolled beach is popular with bathers and surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 300 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Swim Torquay

Although Torquay is known for its pounding surf, there are also some great spots sheltered from the swell that are terrific for families and swimming. Cosy Corner is between Torquay front beach and the rocks at Point Danger and Fishermans Beach is between Whites Beach and Zeally Bay.

Torquay Walking Trails

There are several designated walking trails offering a different perspective on Torquay. The foreshore trail, beginning at Deep Creek Reserve on the Esplanade, takes in spectacular coastal views, children’s playgrounds and public art. The Surf Coast walk is a 30km long marked trail and individual sections can be completed depending on energy levels. It begins at Jan Juc and passes through Bells Beach, Point Addis, Anglesea, Aireys Inlet, Fairhaven and Torquay. A complete guide is available from the Torquay Visitor Information Centre. The Deep Creek Reserve is a strip of land extending along the watercourse between the Surf Coast Highway and The Esplanade. It is the last remnant of Torquay’s indigenous vegetation and there are walking tracks throughout the reserve.

Torquay Whites Beach

Point Impossible is a low, calcarenite point, capped by 10 m high foredunes and bordered by the mouth of Thompson Creek. The gravel road from Torquay runs out to the point, where there is a large car park. A small beach (Point Impossible Beach) lies in front of the car park and forms the western boundary of Thompson Creek. A foreshore reserve and the road back the 4.5 km long Whites Beach, with car parks and access tracks across the dune. The eastern section of the beach, just back from the point, is an official Optional Dress (nude) Beach. The beach faces south-east and is protected to the south by Point Danger, and along the central-eastern section by extensive rock reefs. As a result, waves average 1 m at the beach and usually produce a continuous, shallow bar only cut by rips during and following high seas. Swimming The small Point Impossible Beach varies with wave and tide conditions. Take care if swimming here and watch the deeper tidal channel and currents. Whites Beach is a moderately safe beach close inshore, in lee of the reefs. Watch for rips during higher waves, particularly near the reefs and rocks. Surfing Usually low shorebreaks along the beach. However during big winter swell, many surfers head for Point Impossible, where there are two breaks. These are Insides against the car park and creek, when waves are up to 1.5 m; and Outsides on the outer reef, when waves are higher. Fishing The point and creek mouth are the most popular spots, with the beach tending to be shallow. General A natural beach next to the popular town of Torquay, used by those who want to get away from the more crowded (and clothed) town beaches. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Turtons Track

A stretch of road that takes perfect curves through towering rainforest, a drive along Turtons Track will have you feeling like the star of a new sports car commercial. It is considered the prettiest section of road in the forest, linking Tanybryn with Beech Forest.

Volcanic Plains Tour

The land North of Colac has an explosive past, the area once brimming with volcanic acitivity. Early settlers in the area used the volcanic stones cleared from the fields to build the dry stone walls that are a charming feature of the region. Through Beeac and Alvie, follow the road signs to the Red Rock viewing platform to see the vast volcanic plains, dormant craters and crater lakes of the Kanawinka Wold listed Geopark. Head back to Colac to explore the botanic gardens or heritage trail.

Apollo Bay Cinema

Situated on Mechanics Hill on the Great Ocean Road in Apollo Bay, Apollo Bay Cinema plays the latest release movies. Operating during School Holidays, this is a great way to keep the kids entertained. All movie dates and times are published via a program on the Apollo Bay Cinema website.
 

Where Can I Stay?

Use our accommodation
finder to find and book online.
 

What Can I Do?

Plan your perfect getaway
before leaving the house.
 

Where Can I Eat & Drink?

Plan and locate your eating
and drinking options.
 

What's On?

Discover all the exciting
events in our region.

Packages & Offers

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks, sample some of the regions finest produce, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh.

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite.

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

$240 per couple per night

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway.

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks and find the best spot to capture the setting sun. Sample some of the regions finest artisan products from both the Bellarine and Mornington Peninsulas. Enjoy a regional produce platter with an award winning wine, locally made ale or cider, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

$35.00 per person (includes return sailing between Sorrento and Queenscliff)

Every Friday and Saturday from April to December
4pm sailing from Sorrento
5pm sailing from Queenscliff

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.
Enjoy table service in elegant surroundings, exquisite food, quality tea and real coffee!

$40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.

Every Sunday from February to November
12pm sailing from Sorrento
3pm sailing from Queenscliff.

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

$317 for 2 adults & up to 2 children (save 60%)

  • 2 nights in a Lonsdale Villa
  • Unlimited Mountain Bike Hire
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • A daily Espresso Coffee or Hot Chocolate per person
  • A bottle of local wine
  • Free Daily Kids Activities
  • An extra Long Late Check-out to 6.00pm

Plus get two LI'TYA Deep Ocean Renewal Facials for the price of 1 at the resort's Mud Day Spa (save $120)

And there's plenty of indoor fun at the resort with an indoor heated swimming pool and 8-seater spa, an indoor toddler playroom and a games room. Add another layer of clothing and there's even more to explore outside! BIG4 Beacon Resort is the ideal base to check out Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale.

Phone 1800 351 152 or Book Online.

Terms and Conditions: Offer expires on 31/08/2014

 

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh. Make a weekend of exploring Queenscliff with 2 nights’ accommodation at the award-winning BIG4 Beacon Resort including Blues Train tickets, return transfers to the event, buffet breakfast, 6pm checkout, local discounts and more.

Only $487 per couple.

Phone: 1800 351 152 or visit BIG4 Beacon Resort for more information.
 

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite. Enjoy fabulous bonuses including:

  • A $70 dinner voucher
  • Welcome pack including wine, chocolates and a breakfast basket
Stay between Sunday and Thursday nights and receive THREE nights accommodation for the same price.

T: 03 5254 1066
 

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

This winter, guests who book a standard room at our normal Bed and Breakfast rate play golf for free. Want an even better reason to take a break? The Club is rated one of Australia’s Top 10 public access courses.

From $240 per room per night.
($120 p/p twin share)

  • Accommodation in a standard room with ensuite at Barwon Heads Golf Club
  • Fully cooked breakfast
  • A complimentary round of golf each person (normally up to $85 each).

Address: Golf Links Rd, Barwon Heads, Victoria 3227

To book:

Phone: 03 5255 6255
Fax: 03 5255 6266
Website: www.bhgc.com.au
Email: reservations@bhgc.com.au

T&C's: Valid Sunday to Thursday inclusive. 1st June to 31 August 2014. Dress requirements apply on course and in the clubhouse.
 

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway. When life gets a little overwhelming, an escape with your best friends can be the best way to share some uninterrupted catch up time, a little relaxation and, of course, some well-deserved indulgence on looking after you.

$798 is for 4 people ($199.50 per person) and includes:

  • 2 nights accommodation at Beacon Resort in a Curlewis Villa
  • A Food Purveyor "Little Extra" Hamper (special treats from our region including jams, chocolates, tapenade and much much more)
  • 1 x bottle of Jack Rabbit Sparkling
  • 4 x 60 minute relaxation massages in our day spa
  • Return transfers to a venue of choice (within 3225 postcode area during your stay)
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • 12 noon check-out

This offer is valid until the 20th December 2014; No further discounts apply; Some exclusion periods to apply; Package is subject to availability at the time of booking.