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What can't you do?  That would be a shorter list.  There are attractions, activities, events and features throughout the region to suit all ages and interest groups.  From theme parks for children to adventure sports for adrenaline junkies.  From gourmet food and wine experiences to bushwalking through campsites.  From a simple dip in the ocean to a luxurious spa retreat.  There really is something for everyone.

Things to See & Do

Family Activities

Eastern Beach

The art-deco swimming enclosure at Eastern Beach has been a Geelong favourite for generations. Built in the 1930’s, the ‘Promenade’ is a wooden structure built in an arc, great for walking on a warm evening. The swimming area also has a large tower and diving boards. There is a separate children’s pool that is enclosed and paved. On shore, there is a fantastic adventure playground with plenty of spectator seats for the grown ups. There are large areas of lawn perfect for picnics or, depending on the season, a kick of the football or a game of cricket. There are toilet and dressing room facilities, and the beach is patrolled by lifesavers during summer. There is also a restaurant / café / kiosk on site. The whole area is set amongst grassy hills and enormous trees, and several of the buildings in the precinct are listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.

Swim Torquay

Although Torquay is known for its pounding surf, there are also some great spots sheltered from the swell that are terrific for families and swimming. Cosy Corner is between Torquay front beach and the rocks at Point Danger and Fishermans Beach is between Whites Beach and Zeally Bay.

Boating & Sailing

Geelong Waterfront

Building their city on a North-facing bay was a stroke of genius for the forefathers of Geelong. Generations later, residents and visitors alike are enjoying the benefits of the area collectively known as 'The Waterfront'. Stretching from Eastern Beach around to Rippleside, the area incorporates many restaurants and cafes on the water's edge. There are places for kids to play, from open grassy areas to some of the biggest and best playgrounds in the region. There are kids attractions including the carousel, a miniature train ride and a skate park. Seasonally there are also bungee trampolines and a giant ferris wheel. Childrens attractions, open public space, a lively calendar of events and fabulous places to eat and drink make the Waterfront a Geelong must-do.

Beaches

Ocean Grove Beach

Ocean Grove Beach is located in the centre of the 9.5 km long beach that curves in a broad, south facing arc from Point Lonsdale to the Barwon River mouth. The Ocean Grove section is 2 km long and faces south-east. Some protection is offered by Barwon Heads and the beach receives waves averaging 1.4m. These waves interact with the fine beach sand to produce a wide, low gradient beach face, fronted by a 300m wide surf zone that contains strong rips every 250m. During moderate waves, the rips increase in size and intensity toward Collendina, while decreasing toward Barwon Heads. At low tide, the beach and exposed bar can be over 100 m wide, with the deeper rip channels clearly visible. The town of Ocean Grove backs the beach, with a wide, well-arranged foreshore reserve between the town and the beach. It provides extensive parking, together with most beach amenities. The good parking and easy access, together with the surf club patrols and slightly lower waves make this a popular summer beach. The Ocean Grove Surf Life Saving Club was formed in 1948 and performs an average of 8 rescues each year. Swimming A moderately safe beach, particularly during average summer conditions, when extensive bars dominate. Best at high tide, however watch the rips, particularly at low tide. Best to stay between the flags. Surfing Usually has wide, moderate to low beach breaks; more popular with summer surfers. Fishing Best to go up the beach away from the summer crowds, and where rip holes are more common. General A popular summer beach, which can hold a large crowd. It has a wide, shallow surf zone with rips increasing up the beach, so it is best to stay near the surf club and bathe in the patrolled area. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

point-danger-marine-sanctuary

Located in Torquay, one of Victoria's favourite seaside towns, the reef is ideal for snorkelling and exploring the diverse marine life at low tide. The area between Torquay's back and front beaches is formed of beds of crumbling limestone and a narrow rock platform which extends to the west. A small reef which is only exposed at the lowest of summer tides lies just offshore and is often isolated from the beach by a deep sandy channel. One shipwreck is found within the park, the Joseph H. Scammell. The limestone reef is an enthralling feature of this park. Covered in small boulders and intricate seaweed beds, the reef is home to a number of weird and wonderful creatures. Most noteworthy is the huge diversity of seaslugs, currently 96 species known to occur in this sanctuary, many of which are endemic. These fascinating creatures can be any colour of the rainbow and come in a range of exquisite shapes and sizes. Also present are carnivorous worms, delicate brittle stars and majestic eagle rays. See if you can spot a Fairy Tern, a rare and endangered bird which uses habitats in Point Danger Marine Sanctuary for feeding and roosting. Before you go, note that conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.
Bancoora Beach
Near Torquay

Bancoora Beach

Bancoora Beach is a 1 km long, south-east facing beach located between low, basaltic, rocky points and reefs, and backed by a natural, vegetated foredune. The Bancoora Surf Life Saving Club and car park are located behind the foredune, leaving the beach in an attractive natural state. The beach receives waves averaging 1.3 m, which usually cut three rips across the 80 m wide single bar and surf zone. Higher waves intensify the rips, with strong permanent rips running out against the rocks at each end. On average, 10 people are rescued here each year. Swimming An attractive, moderately safe, patrolled beach, particularly during lower summer swell. Stay on the bars in the patrolled area, and avoid the strong rips near the rocks. Surfing Usually a low to moderate beach break, with a right hand point break out on the southern point during higher swell. Fishing Popular in summer with the campers. Offers both beach fishing with some rip holes and rock fishing off the points. General An out of the way, relatively natural beach, more popular in summer when the nearby caravan park is full and the beach is patrolled. It is only used by surfers in winter. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Beaches near Barwon Heads

At Barwon Heads, the coast trends due west for 7 km to Black Rocks. The first 2 km are dominated by calcarenite rocks and reefs, which outcrop on the beach and in the surf. These divide the coast into three beaches. The first (285) is below Point Finders and is a 50 m pocket of sand facing south-east and bordered by rock platforms and reefs. The two Barwon Heads beaches (286, 287) face south and are more exposed, with higher waves and patchy reefs. These conditions result in a wide, low gradient beach, rock flat and surf, with persistent and some permanent rips against the reefs. All three beaches are easily accessible. There is a car park and a lookout on Point Flinders, and car parks on the Torquay Road, which parallels the two Barwon Heads beaches. Swimming Point Flinders is relatively safe close inshore, however there are rocks and reefs off the beach. The Barwon Heads beaches are both potentially hazardous, owing to the higher waves, reefs and strong permanent rips. Surfing There are several breaks along this section, mostly reef breaks that work best at higher tide, with a low to moderate swell and north winds. Those immediately west of Point Flinders are called The Hole. Fishing There are excellent rip holes and gutters next to the reefs, together with rocks and reefs to fish from at low tide. General A reef dominated section of coast, most suitable for beach fishing and experienced surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Breamlea

Breamlea is a small holiday settlement lying between the banks of Thompson Creek and Breamlea Beach. The beach faces south-south-east and runs for 2 km from the low basalt rocks at Noble Rocks to the mouth of the creek at Point Impossible. There is road access to the back of the fore dunes, with foot tracks crossing the 20 m high fore dune to reach the beach. The beach receives waves averaging just over 1 m, which usually produce an attached bar cut by rips every 250 m. At the creek mouth, both a tidal channel and shoals are present. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach, owing to the persistent rips and creek mouth. Stay on the attached section of the bars and clear of the rips, rocks and creek. Surfing Usually low to moderate beach breaks along the length of the beach. Fishing This beach has rocks at one end, the creek at the other and usually rip holes and gutters along the beach. General A natural beach, mainly used by the Breamlea locals for bathing, surfing and fishing. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Jan Juc Beach

Jan Juc Beach is located immediately south of Torquay and is a little more exposed, receiving waves averaging 1.4 m. It extends for 1.2 km between Rocky Point and Bird Rock and faces almost due south, resulting in larger waves. The waves combine with the fine to medium sand to produce a single bar cut by three to four rips, with permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The northern half of the beach is backed by low bluffs, partly covered by dunes. The surf lifesaving club, parking and access, together with Jan Juc Creek, are in the centre, while the narrow, southern half of the beach is backed by 20 m high cliffs. The Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club was founded in 1963 and annually rescues an average of 30 people. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, owing to the high waves and persistent rips. More suitable for experienced bathers and surfers. Stay between the flags and away from the rips and rocks. Surfing Usually variable beach breaks, however Bird Rock can provide excellent rights with a moderate swell and high tide. Fishing Best toward the northern end where rip holes are more persistent. General Jan Juc is Torquay's second and more exposed surfing beach. Still popular in summer for those escaping the Torquay crowds, however the variable beach and surf conditions warrant extra care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.
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Scuba Diving

Point Addis Marine National Park

The Point Addis Marine National Park features spectacular scenery with wide sandy beaches, crumbling limestone and sandstone cliffs, rocky platforms and copious small rocky reefs. The coastline is exposed to intense wave action from the southern ocean, a major contributor to the shaping of this rugged coastline. Visitors exploring the marine environment within this park may enjoy exploring the limestone reefs with abundant rockpools filled with marine life. The subtidal waters are recognised as supporting a wide range of fish and algae species as well as seals, dolphins, brilliantly coloured sponge gardens and extensive rhodolith beds. Offshore, and often difficult to access due to tides and swell, Ingoldsby Reef is a particularly popular destination for divers to explore and search for such creatures. Aboriginal Traditional Owners Parks Victoria acknowledges the Aboriginal Traditional Owners of Victoria - including its parks and reserves. Through their cultural traditions, Aboriginal people maintain their connection to their ancestral lands and waters. Indigenous tradition indicates that this park is part of the Country of the Wathaurong people and that Indigenous people have a long association with this region. Before you go Conditions can change in parks for many reasons. For the latest information on changes to local conditions, please visit the relevant park page on the Parks Victoria website. Be bushfire ready in the great outdoors. Refer to the Bushfire Safety section on the Parks Victoria website for tips on how to stay safe.
 

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Packages & Offers

BIG 4 Beacon Resort Blues Train Package

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, a cool drink and a good laugh. Rock your stay in Queenscliff with Blues Train tickets and award winning accommodation at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite.

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

$240 per couple per night

BIG 4 Beacon Resort Blues Train Package

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, a cool drink and a good laugh. Rock your stay in Queenscliff with Blues Train tickets and award winning accommodation at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Phone: 1800 351 152 or visit BIG4 Beacon Resort Website for more information.
 

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite. Enjoy fabulous bonuses including:

  • A $70 dinner voucher
  • Welcome pack including wine, chocolates and a breakfast basket
Stay between Sunday and Thursday nights and receive THREE nights accommodation for the same price.

T: 03 5254 1066
 

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

This winter, guests who book a standard room at our normal Bed and Breakfast rate play golf for free. Want an even better reason to take a break? The Club is rated one of Australia’s Top 10 public access courses.

From $240 per room per night.
($120 p/p twin share)

  • Accommodation in a standard room with ensuite at Barwon Heads Golf Club
  • Fully cooked breakfast
  • A complimentary round of golf each person (normally up to $85 each).

Address: Golf Links Rd, Barwon Heads, Victoria 3227

To book:

Phone: 03 5255 6255
Fax: 03 5255 6266
Website: www.bhgc.com.au
Email: reservations@bhgc.com.au

T&C's: Valid Sunday to Thursday inclusive. 1st June to 31 August 2014. Dress requirements apply on course and in the clubhouse.