Great Ocean Road
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Visitor information

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Visitor Information Centres

The Great Ocean Road has several local accredited Visitor Information Centres. Drop in or call for more information on the region and help with planning your holiday.

Visitor Information Geelong and The Great Ocean Road Geelong and Great Ocean Road iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
Princes Hwy
Little River, Victoria 3211
Phone (toll free): 1800 755 611
Ph: +61 3 5283 1735
Fax: +61 3 5223 2069
Visitor Information Geelong Small Geelong iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
26 Moorabool St
Geelong, Victoria 3220
Phone (toll free): 1800 755 611
Ph: +61 3 5222 2900
Fax: +61 3 5223 2069
Visitor Information Apollo Bay Apollo Bay iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
100 Great Ocean Road
Apollo Bay, Victoria 3233
Ph: +61 3 5237 6529
Fax: +61 3 5237 6194
Visitor Information Colac Colac iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
Cnr Queen & Murray Sts
Colac, Victoria 3250
Ph: 1300 689 297
Fax: +61 3 5232 2764
Visitor Information Lorne Lorne iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
15 Mountjoy Pde
Lorne, Victoria 3232
Ph: +61 3 5289 1152
Fax: +61 3 5289 2492
Visitor Information Queenscliff Queenscliff iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
55 Hesse St
Queenscliff, Victoria 3225
Ph: +61 3 5258 4843
Fax: +61 3 5258 3726
Visitor Information Torquay Torquay iSign Small ATBA Logo Small
Surf City Plaza
Torquay, Victoria 3228
Ph: +61 3 5261 4219
Fax: +61 3 5261 4756

Look for the iSign Small sign. Offices are open 9am to 5pm, 7 days a week.

When in Melbourne...

If you're in Melbourne we suggest you visit the Visitor Information Centre at Federation Square.

Situated on the corner of Swanston and Flinders Streets, directly across from Flinders Street train station and its tram interchanges, the Visitor Centre is a one-stop shop for discovering what Melbourne and the Great Ocean Road have to offer visitors.

Open: 9am to 6pm, 7 days a week
Ph: +61 3 9658 9658

Highlights

Learn to Surf

What better place to learn to surf than in the birthplace of Australian surfing? There are several licensed tour operators and qualified instructors who run learn to surf classes on beaches close to Torquay. Catering for individuals or groups, often equipment hire and transport can be included in the price.

Surf World Museum

The Surf World Museum in Torquay, Australia’s surfing capital, celebrates the story of surfing. It also charts Australia’s significant contribution to the development of surfing around the world. Through the colourful and exciting permanent displays and temporary exhibitions of important surfing artefacts and memorabilia, the museum commemorates Australia’s fantastic surfing heritage and rich beach culture. An unforgettable experience, Surf World provides the opportunity to immerse yourself in one of Australia’s most popular pastimes. It’s a place where you can experience or relive, surfing’s sense of fun, and marvel at the changes that have taken place over the years. We look forward to welcoming you.

The Surf Coast Walk

Whether you're a nature lover or a fun lover, whether you take an hour, a day or a week, the Surf Coast Walk puts a stunning and unique coastal environment within easy reach. - Offering natural beauty and easy access - A world-class walking destination for all to enjoy - On the edge of the stunning Great Ocean Road - Do a section or do it all; at your own pace - More than a walk, over half the track is suitable for bikes Relish the rich ochre of the Bells Beach cliffs, the deep blue of Bass Strait and the leafy green of eucalypt forects. Discover traditional Wathaurung country, fascinating surf culture and abundant wildlife as the walk connects you with the coastal town comforts of Torquay, Anglesea and Aireys Inlet.

Surfworld Museum Torquay

The Surfworld Museum Torquay celebrates the history of surfing in Australia. It tells the story of this countries rich beach culture and surfing heritage that has developed over the last one hundred years. A visit to Surfworld gives people the opportunity to immerse themselves in beach experience and explore one of Australia's favourite past times. Through themed exhibition spaces and interactive displays, visitors can relive time spent at the beach, or discover the intimate link between surfers and the breaking waves. Find out about surfing hero's and legends in The Australian Surfing Hall Of Fame, which celebrates the lives of Australian surfing champions. You can check out their biographies mounted on a typical example of the board they rode. Relax in the theatre and enjoy spectacular footage of surfers in action while you are surrounded by vintage surf memorabilia and an epic array of historic surfboards. Trace the development of the surfboard along the boardwalk as a breaking wave looms overhead. Explore the many elements that go to make up surf culture, clothes, movies, music, and walk through the ultimate surf mobile, the VW kombi van. Whether you are eight or eighty eight, at the Surfworld Museum Torquay you can ride a wave of history and discover how awesome and inspirational surfing can be. For updates or further information please check their website.
Bancoora Beach
Near Torquay

Bancoora Beach

Bancoora Beach is a 1 km long, south-east facing beach located between low, basaltic, rocky points and reefs, and backed by a natural, vegetated foredune. The Bancoora Surf Life Saving Club and car park are located behind the foredune, leaving the beach in an attractive natural state. The beach receives waves averaging 1.3 m, which usually cut three rips across the 80 m wide single bar and surf zone. Higher waves intensify the rips, with strong permanent rips running out against the rocks at each end. On average, 10 people are rescued here each year. Swimming An attractive, moderately safe, patrolled beach, particularly during lower summer swell. Stay on the bars in the patrolled area, and avoid the strong rips near the rocks. Surfing Usually a low to moderate beach break, with a right hand point break out on the southern point during higher swell. Fishing Popular in summer with the campers. Offers both beach fishing with some rip holes and rock fishing off the points. General An out of the way, relatively natural beach, more popular in summer when the nearby caravan park is full and the beach is patrolled. It is only used by surfers in winter. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Jan Juc Beach

Jan Juc Beach is located immediately south of Torquay and is a little more exposed, receiving waves averaging 1.4 m. It extends for 1.2 km between Rocky Point and Bird Rock and faces almost due south, resulting in larger waves. The waves combine with the fine to medium sand to produce a single bar cut by three to four rips, with permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The northern half of the beach is backed by low bluffs, partly covered by dunes. The surf lifesaving club, parking and access, together with Jan Juc Creek, are in the centre, while the narrow, southern half of the beach is backed by 20 m high cliffs. The Jan Juc Surf Life Saving Club was founded in 1963 and annually rescues an average of 30 people. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, owing to the high waves and persistent rips. More suitable for experienced bathers and surfers. Stay between the flags and away from the rips and rocks. Surfing Usually variable beach breaks, however Bird Rock can provide excellent rights with a moderate swell and high tide. Fishing Best toward the northern end where rip holes are more persistent. General Jan Juc is Torquay's second and more exposed surfing beach. Still popular in summer for those escaping the Torquay crowds, however the variable beach and surf conditions warrant extra care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Sundial of Human Involvement

Picturesquely located on the foreshore land at Fishermans Beach at the corner of Darian Road and The Esplanade, the sundial was assembled in the traditional and time-honoured method of mosaic and comprises more than 120,000 glass Tesserae tiles. The sundial represents the traditional dreaming stories of the indigenous Wathaurong people. Your body becomes the ‘dial’ on this unique piece of art. Stand in the centre of the design and you can tell the time by the shadow cast by your body.

Cycle Torquay

Cycling is a great way to explore the gorgeous coastal and hinterland scenery around Torquay. There are terrific road rides for serious and recreational riders, as well as off road trails to suit mountain bikers or family groups.

Torquay Fishermans Beach

Fishermans Beach, as the name suggests, is a low energy beach traditionally used to launch fishing boats. This is still true today with a boat ramp on the beach, as well as sailing, yacht, and motor boat clubs all located behind the western end of the beach. The beach lies in Zeally Bay and runs south-west for 1 km from the mouth of the small Deep Creek, then south to the 10 m high limestone bluffs at Yellow Bluff. The entire beach is backed by a foreshore reserve and The Esplanade. It has parking areas and other facilities. Swimming A relatively safe beach with a wide, shallow bar and usually no rips. Stay clear of the boating activity near the ramp and boat clubs. Surfing Usually a low shorebreak. Big winter swells do however break over the shallow reefs and bars to produce reasonable waves, when everything else is closed out. Fishing Best off Yellow Bluff at high tide where you can reach the reef. At low tide, shallow water and exposed reefs dominate. General This is Torquay's most protected beach and is very popular in summer with those who are looking for quieter surf conditions. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Front Beach

Torquay's Front Beach fronts the town centre. It is a well-appointed beach with a well-maintained foreshore reserve between The Esplanade and the beach. There are numerous facilities in the reserve, including a tourist information centre. A seawall and a row of tall Norfolk Island pines back the beach, and several wooden groynes cross the beach. The beach faces due east and runs for 1 km from Yellow Bluff to Point Danger. The point and its reefs protect the beach, which receives waves averaging less than 1 m. These maintain a shallow, continuous, attached bar. Swimming This is Torquay's most popular family beach, with usually low waves, a shallow bar and no rips, plus the added safety of a summer lifeguard patrol. Surfing Usually a low beach break used by learners. During big swell, waves can make it around Point Danger to break as right handers off Front Beach. Fishing The best location is on Point Danger. However, watch the waves and tides, as it is awash at high tide. General Torquay's showpiece beach with good access, facilities, a lifeguard and usually low, safe surf. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Torquay Surf (Back) Beach

Torquay is the 'Surfing Capital of Australia'. Torquay Beach was the site of the first malibu board demonstration in Australia, back in 1956. Today Torquay is more important for being the closest town to the famous Bells Beach, and the stepping-off point for a number of surfing locations along the Great Ocean Road. The Torquay Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1945, has also hosted state, national and international surf lifesaving carnivals. More recently, a number of major surfing companies and an excellent Surf World exhibition have been located at Torquay's Surf Coast Plaza. Torquay Beach is 800 m long and faces south-east, with some protection provided toward the southern end by Rocky Point. Extensive intertidal rock reefs lie off Point Danger at the northern end, and Spring Creek drains across the beach just west of the surf club. Waves average 1.2 m and usually cut three rips across the single bar, with additional permanent rips against the rocks at each end. The southern rip, known as the ‘Escalator’ is particularly strong during easterly conditions. The beach itself is moderately steep and is backed by extensive parking areas, particularly along the eastern half. Swimming A very popular summer beach bolstered by its name, good accessibility and surf lifesaving club. The beach is moderately safe on the bars in the patrolled areas, however avoid the rocks and strong rips, particularly toward Point Danger as, on average, 27 people are rescued here each year. Surfing The site of the first short board riding in Australia and still a very popular, if crowded, location year round. The beach offers a wide beach break, which is moderately protected during westerlies, though best in a north-westerly, with a left hander off Point Danger. Fishing Both beach and rock fishing are available, with the best rip holes toward the northern end. Take care on the rocks, as they are awash at high tide. General One of Victoria's best known and most popular summer surfing beaches. The adjacent town offers all facilities, while the patrolled beach is popular with bathers and surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 300 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Swim Torquay

Although Torquay is known for its pounding surf, there are also some great spots sheltered from the swell that are terrific for families and swimming. Cosy Corner is between Torquay front beach and the rocks at Point Danger and Fishermans Beach is between Whites Beach and Zeally Bay.

Torquay Walking Trails

There are several designated walking trails offering a different perspective on Torquay. The foreshore trail, beginning at Deep Creek Reserve on the Esplanade, takes in spectacular coastal views, children’s playgrounds and public art. The Surf Coast walk is a 30km long marked trail and individual sections can be completed depending on energy levels. It begins at Jan Juc and passes through Bells Beach, Point Addis, Anglesea, Aireys Inlet, Fairhaven and Torquay. A complete guide is available from the Torquay Visitor Information Centre. The Deep Creek Reserve is a strip of land extending along the watercourse between the Surf Coast Highway and The Esplanade. It is the last remnant of Torquay’s indigenous vegetation and there are walking tracks throughout the reserve.

Torquay Whites Beach

Point Impossible is a low, calcarenite point, capped by 10 m high foredunes and bordered by the mouth of Thompson Creek. The gravel road from Torquay runs out to the point, where there is a large car park. A small beach (Point Impossible Beach) lies in front of the car park and forms the western boundary of Thompson Creek. A foreshore reserve and the road back the 4.5 km long Whites Beach, with car parks and access tracks across the dune. The eastern section of the beach, just back from the point, is an official Optional Dress (nude) Beach. The beach faces south-east and is protected to the south by Point Danger, and along the central-eastern section by extensive rock reefs. As a result, waves average 1 m at the beach and usually produce a continuous, shallow bar only cut by rips during and following high seas. Swimming The small Point Impossible Beach varies with wave and tide conditions. Take care if swimming here and watch the deeper tidal channel and currents. Whites Beach is a moderately safe beach close inshore, in lee of the reefs. Watch for rips during higher waves, particularly near the reefs and rocks. Surfing Usually low shorebreaks along the beach. However during big winter swell, many surfers head for Point Impossible, where there are two breaks. These are Insides against the car park and creek, when waves are up to 1.5 m; and Outsides on the outer reef, when waves are higher. Fishing The point and creek mouth are the most popular spots, with the beach tending to be shallow. General A natural beach next to the popular town of Torquay, used by those who want to get away from the more crowded (and clothed) town beaches. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

jirrahlinga-koala-wildlife-sanctuary

The Jirrahlinga Koala & Wildlife Sanctuary is situated on five acres of land on the Northern edge of Barwon Heads. Jirrahlinga, Aboriginal for 'Seek a home for a kangaroo', was established more than 30 years ago by Tehree Gordon to be a haven for injured wildlife. Following the Ash Wednesday Bush fires in 1983, Jirrahlinga received national and international media coverage acclaiming the rescue mission launched to seek out and treat shocked and burnt animals. However, Jirrahlinga is not just for distressed native animals, it is primarily about people. Particularly people who have a disability, a special need, the frail or the aged. What better therapy could there be than to come into a supportive environment to work quietly with animals or just visit and touch a koala or joey that do not place demands on a person's physical or mental capacities.
Spring Creek Horse Riding
Near Anglesea

Spring Creek Horse Riding

Nestled in the beautiful Spring Creek Valley, experience spectacular riding through the unique bushlands of the Great Otway National Park with Spring Creek Horse Riding. Trail rides to suit beginners and experienced riders. Spring Creek Horse Riding is only ten minutes drive from Torquay and Anglesea. Offering one to two hour rides. Full day rides are also available. Booking is essential to avoid disappointment. Please visit the Spring Creek Horse Riding website for details.

Anglesea Art Walk

Spanning 2.5 kilometres and featuring six mosaic art pieces, the Anglesea Art Walk highlights the history and unique flora and fauna of this extraordinary place. It starts at the JE Loveridge lookout with sensational panoramic views of the Surf Coast and concludes in the valley at the Anglesea Primary School.

Anglesea Beach

Anglesea Beach lies next to the mouth of the Anglesea River and fronts the town of Anglesea. The beach is 400 m long and curves in a south to south-east facing arc between the usually closed river mouth and the eroding rocks and cliffs in front of the bluff-top Anglesea Surf Life Saving Club. Access and parking are available at the river mouth, off the Great Ocean Road, and at the surf club. The beach receives waves averaging 1 m. The larger ocean waves are reduced as they refract around Point Roadknight. They produce a wide, shallow, single bar, which is usually attached to the beach south of the surf lifesaving club. It is increasingly cut by rips toward the river mouth. The Anglesea Surf Life Saving Club was formed in 1952 and annually averages 12 rescues. Swimming A moderately safe beach under typical summer conditions, however avoid the rip against the southern rocks. Best at high tide as waves tend to dump at low tide. Stay on the bar and in the patrolled area. Surfing Popular with the less experienced surfers who use the wide, gently sloping surf zone. Fishing Beach fishing is best at the river mouth where rip holes are more prevalent. General A popular summer beach, offering good parking and access, and a moderately safe patrolled beach. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Anglesea Point Roadknight Beach

Point Roadknight is a narrow ridge of dune calcarenite that parallels the adjoining Urquhart Bluff Beach. The point and its reef protrude 500 m to the east and afford considerable protection to the beach. The beach is 700 m long and faces north-east. It lies between the slippery Soapy Rocks and the point. Beware of the slippery rocks which are a hazard to walk on. There is road access to the back of the beach, a large car park, a boat ramp and a yacht club. Waves reaching the beach average less than 1 m, which results in a continuous, attached bar and usually no rips. Swimming This is the safest beach in the Anglesea region and is also patrolled daily by lifeguards during the Christmas holiday period. Surfing Usually too small to bother about. Fishing Better off the point than the beach. General A popular summer beach for those who want lower waves and the added safety of a patrolled beach. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 4 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Anglesea Riverbank

A series of flowing channels connected by bike paths and bridges make Anglesea River a popular destination for activities such as fishing from one of the many platforms, canoeing, windsurfing, sailing or hiring a paddle boat. The wide river is ideal for numerous activities to suit all ages. The many bbq’s and tables along the riverbank also make it an ideal picnic area. The river and its surroundings is also an important habitat for native wildlife including owls, possums, echidnas, kangaroo and wallabies, as well as native fish, eels and many species of waterbird.

Anglesea Walks

With a variety of bush, coast and heathland to be explored in the area, Anglesea is a fantastic place to put on your walking shoes. Enjoy a pleasant 20 minute stroll from Main Beach to Pt Roadknight or do the Point Addis Koorie Cultural Walk to see some amazing birdlife including finches and parrots and some very pretty wildflowers in the spring and early summer. Visit the Surf Coast Walk page for more walking tracks: www.surfcoastwalks.com.au. For a more in-depth and educational experience, why not take a guided walk with a local tour company? They will offer insight into the history and ecology of the local area that for an experience that enriches your mind as much as your body.

Beaches near Barwon Heads

At Barwon Heads, the coast trends due west for 7 km to Black Rocks. The first 2 km are dominated by calcarenite rocks and reefs, which outcrop on the beach and in the surf. These divide the coast into three beaches. The first (285) is below Point Finders and is a 50 m pocket of sand facing south-east and bordered by rock platforms and reefs. The two Barwon Heads beaches (286, 287) face south and are more exposed, with higher waves and patchy reefs. These conditions result in a wide, low gradient beach, rock flat and surf, with persistent and some permanent rips against the reefs. All three beaches are easily accessible. There is a car park and a lookout on Point Flinders, and car parks on the Torquay Road, which parallels the two Barwon Heads beaches. Swimming Point Flinders is relatively safe close inshore, however there are rocks and reefs off the beach. The Barwon Heads beaches are both potentially hazardous, owing to the higher waves, reefs and strong permanent rips. Surfing There are several breaks along this section, mostly reef breaks that work best at higher tide, with a low to moderate swell and north winds. Those immediately west of Point Flinders are called The Hole. Fishing There are excellent rip holes and gutters next to the reefs, together with rocks and reefs to fish from at low tide. General A reef dominated section of coast, most suitable for beach fishing and experienced surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Thirteenth Beach Barwon Heads

Thirteenth Beach is part of the 7 km long section of coast between Barwon Heads and Black Rock. It occupies the western 4.5 km and faces essentially due south. The beach receives waves averaging 1.5 m, is moderately sloping and is fronted by a single bar, dominated by rips every 250 m. The beach is backed by a vegetated foredune for most of its length, and the Barwon Heads to Torquay Road. The best access is provided at the surf lifesaving club, with additional car parks and access tracks located along the road. The surf club, founded in 1961, is the only development on what is a relatively natural beach. Its members rescue 5 people on average each year. Swimming Rips are a common feature of the beach, with safest bathing on the bars in the patrolled area. Strong permanent rips lie east of the surf club. The western end is adjacent to the Black Rock sewer outlet and should be avoided. Surfing A popular surfing beach with low to moderate swell providing numerous beach breaks, all readily accessible from the main road. One of the more popular areas is in front of the shipping beacon, known as The Beacon. Best with northerly winds. Fishing A good, natural spot for beach fishing, with good road access to the numerous rip holes that persist along the beach. General A relatively undeveloped beach, more popular with surfers and bathers who want a patrolled beach away from the crowds. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Barwon River

From its beginnings in the Otway Ranges, the Barwon River winds its way through suburban Geelong before flowing into the ocean at Barwon Heads. The mouth of the river has sandy banks that are popular with walkers and families having a paddle or building sandcastles. Fishing is popular on the jetties near the mouth of the river and kayakers and paddlers are often seen in this area. Barwon Heads has a sailing club where laser yachts are often seen at high tide. There are also BBQs and picnic areas alongside the riverbank.

Breamlea

Breamlea is a small holiday settlement lying between the banks of Thompson Creek and Breamlea Beach. The beach faces south-south-east and runs for 2 km from the low basalt rocks at Noble Rocks to the mouth of the creek at Point Impossible. There is road access to the back of the fore dunes, with foot tracks crossing the 20 m high fore dune to reach the beach. The beach receives waves averaging just over 1 m, which usually produce an attached bar cut by rips every 250 m. At the creek mouth, both a tidal channel and shoals are present. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach, owing to the persistent rips and creek mouth. Stay on the attached section of the bars and clear of the rips, rocks and creek. Surfing Usually low to moderate beach breaks along the length of the beach. Fishing This beach has rocks at one end, the creek at the other and usually rip holes and gutters along the beach. General A natural beach, mainly used by the Breamlea locals for bathing, surfing and fishing. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Coogarah Park

Popular with families for its shipwreck playground, BBQ facilities and picnic areas, Coogarah Park set on the riverbank just a couple of minutes from the centre of town provides the children with hours of entertainment. There are also walking tracks and a skate park in the grounds.

Great Ocean Road Memorial Archway

Built as a tribute to the soldiers from the First World War who were engaged in the construction of the Great Ocean Road, the memorial arch provides a great photographic opportunity for travellers entering Lorne. Alongside the arch is a sculpture also commemorating the returned servicemen, which was commissioned and placed during the 75th anniversary of the road celebrations. There is a carpark alongside this area so visitors can make the most of this photo opportuniy.

A Maze N Games

Located in Wallington, A Maze 'N Games is the place to be; hosting one of the largest three dimensional timber mazes in Australia. You can challenge yourself in the giant maze, or on their adventurous 18 hole mini golf course. You can relax your mind inside the cafe with coffee and delicious home-made cakes or light snacks. You could also enjoy the great barbecue facilities undercover while the kids explore the playgrounds. Enjoy browsing in the spacious shop, which has an extensive range of clever Gifts for all ages, many are set up for you to try. A Maze N Games specialise in Children's Birthday Parties!!

Adventure Park

Super charge your summer at Victoria's biggest theme park! With awesome family fun all day long, Adventure Park Geelong is home to some of the coolest water rides in Australia. Victoria's hottest and biggest theme park, Adventure Park, located just ten minutes from Geelong boasts exciting rides and attractions, perfect for the whole family! Just some of the ways you can make a gigantic splash and enjoy the unlimited rides all day long include: - Raft the roaring rapids on The River Torrent Lazy River, with twisting tides and swirling gauntlets along a tropical river oasis - Speed down head first and experience the ultimate adrenaline rush of the Six Lane Aqua Racer, a speed slide for the serious thrill-seekers which can take you up to 40km per hour - Race down The Gold Rush Rapids in a speedy 20 seconds and take the two metre plunge - Take a splash in the dark on the Wild West Canyon on a two-seater raft, experiencing twists and 360 degree turns! Adventure Park is doing it for the kids, too! The Tiny Tots Splashzone keeps the young ones cool, safe and entertained, with waterfalls, mini waterslides and spray cannons throughout. While Bonito's Bay Water Play offers a state-of-the-art aquatic playground including waterfalls, water jets and more pirate-filled water fun. On dry land, families can take a ride on the popular Go Karts and Little Buggy Speedway, try a hand at archery, discover the Galactic Games World, challenge family and friends to a game of mini golf, take a leisurely ride on the new Paddle boats and watch the world go by on the classic carousel. Bring in a picnic, hire a barbecue and relax lakeside under shaded picnic areas, marquees and pavilions, set amongst 21 hectares of landscaped parkland.

Bellarine Adventure Golf

You may have played mini golf or putt putt before but never like this, Bellarine Adventure Golf takes mini golf to another level. Set amongst beautiful gardens complete with creeks and waterfalls, the 36 ingeniously crafted holes will keep players of all ages both entertained and challenged. Multi-level greens, balls that seem to defy the laws of gravity, tricky water hazards and sticky sand traps ensure that everyone's games certainly will be an adventure in which both luck and skill play a part! There are two 18 hole courses to choose from: the Mill offers a great, fun course with plenty of shelter making it playable even if the weather isn't the best, while the Mountain course offers a bit more of a challenge for those wanting to really test their skills. Or play both courses, taking advantage of the generous discounts on second rounds. Bellarine Adventure Golf have a café that offers great locally roasted coffee from Geelong's own Capra Coffee and a great selection of snacks and cookies to enjoy along with it. Groups, clubs and schools love the function room and barbecue facilities plus the delicious catering that is available. Kids' birthday parties are also a specialty. Check Bellarine Adventure Golf's Facebook page for regular special offers or contact them for further information.

Bellarine Railway

The Bellarine Railway is a volunteer operated organisation located on the Bellarine Peninsula, offering heritage train rides and experiences between Queenscliff and Drysdale, on board a collection of steam and diesel trains originating from around Australia. The heritage service is available on Sundays, most public holidays, as well as Tuesdays and Thursdays during the school holidays. Extra running days are available of the summer holidays. Carriage hire is available as part of the heritage service and perfect for children's parties or groups looking for the benefits of private train hire without the added cost. Experiences and special events offered are Steam and Diesel Train Driver Experiences, a Day out with Thomas weekends, Special occasion and wedding charters, Mid-week steam and diesel trips, Tailored group and school tours and Home of The Blues Train. Gift certificates and vouchers are available for all services, experiences and events.

Fairy Park

Fairy Park is a place dedicated to story telling of fairy tales and ancient myths and legends. A spectacular rocky hilltop has been crafted into a truly unique place where family and friends come to relax and enjoy a day out together in a tranquil environment. Most visitors spend the day but if you are in a hurry allow a couple of hours to get a feel for the place. The three main areas that combine to form Fairy Park are the Fairytale Land, Camelot Playground and the Elephant Rock Picnic Grounds. Suitable for the young and the young at heart, Fairy Park will delight and intrigue all those who make take the journey.

Eastern Beach

The art-deco swimming enclosure at Eastern Beach has been a Geelong favourite for generations. Built in the 1930’s, the ‘Promenade’ is a wooden structure built in an arc, great for walking on a warm evening. The swimming area also has a large tower and diving boards. There is a separate children’s pool that is enclosed and paved. On shore, there is a fantastic adventure playground with plenty of spectator seats for the grown ups. There are large areas of lawn perfect for picnics or, depending on the season, a kick of the football or a game of cricket. There are toilet and dressing room facilities, and the beach is patrolled by lifesavers during summer. There is also a restaurant / café / kiosk on site. The whole area is set amongst grassy hills and enormous trees, and several of the buildings in the precinct are listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.
 

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Packages & Offers

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks, sample some of the regions finest produce, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh.

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite.

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

$240 per couple per night

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway.

Twilight Cruise - Searoad Ferries

Take a stroll on the viewing decks and find the best spot to capture the setting sun. Sample some of the regions finest artisan products from both the Bellarine and Mornington Peninsulas. Enjoy a regional produce platter with an award winning wine, locally made ale or cider, all in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge.

$35.00 per person (includes return sailing between Sorrento and Queenscliff)

Every Friday and Saturday from April to December
4pm sailing from Sorrento
5pm sailing from Queenscliff

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.
Enjoy table service in elegant surroundings, exquisite food, quality tea and real coffee!

$40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.

Every Sunday from February to November
12pm sailing from Sorrento
3pm sailing from Queenscliff.

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

Drive In + Chill Out at BIG4 Beacon Resort

$317 for 2 adults & up to 2 children (save 60%)

  • 2 nights in a Lonsdale Villa
  • Unlimited Mountain Bike Hire
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • A daily Espresso Coffee or Hot Chocolate per person
  • A bottle of local wine
  • Free Daily Kids Activities
  • An extra Long Late Check-out to 6.00pm

Plus get two LI'TYA Deep Ocean Renewal Facials for the price of 1 at the resort's Mud Day Spa (save $120)

And there's plenty of indoor fun at the resort with an indoor heated swimming pool and 8-seater spa, an indoor toddler playroom and a games room. Add another layer of clothing and there's even more to explore outside! BIG4 Beacon Resort is the ideal base to check out Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale.

Phone 1800 351 152 or Book Online.

Terms and Conditions: Offer expires on 31/08/2014

 

Legendary Blues Train Weekend: Stay & Play, Save 50%

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, cool drinks and a good laugh. Make a weekend of exploring Queenscliff with 2 nights’ accommodation at the award-winning BIG4 Beacon Resort including Blues Train tickets, return transfers to the event, buffet breakfast, 6pm checkout, local discounts and more.

Only $487 per couple.

Phone: 1800 351 152 or visit BIG4 Beacon Resort for more information.
 

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite. Enjoy fabulous bonuses including:

  • A $70 dinner voucher
  • Welcome pack including wine, chocolates and a breakfast basket
Stay between Sunday and Thursday nights and receive THREE nights accommodation for the same price.

T: 03 5254 1066
 

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

This winter, guests who book a standard room at our normal Bed and Breakfast rate play golf for free. Want an even better reason to take a break? The Club is rated one of Australia’s Top 10 public access courses.

From $240 per room per night.
($120 p/p twin share)

  • Accommodation in a standard room with ensuite at Barwon Heads Golf Club
  • Fully cooked breakfast
  • A complimentary round of golf each person (normally up to $85 each).

Address: Golf Links Rd, Barwon Heads, Victoria 3227

To book:

Phone: 03 5255 6255
Fax: 03 5255 6266
Website: www.bhgc.com.au
Email: reservations@bhgc.com.au

T&C's: Valid Sunday to Thursday inclusive. 1st June to 31 August 2014. Dress requirements apply on course and in the clubhouse.
 

Girls Indulgence Getaway

Reboot your life with an indulgent Girl's Getaway. When life gets a little overwhelming, an escape with your best friends can be the best way to share some uninterrupted catch up time, a little relaxation and, of course, some well-deserved indulgence on looking after you.

$798 is for 4 people ($199.50 per person) and includes:

  • 2 nights accommodation at Beacon Resort in a Curlewis Villa
  • A Food Purveyor "Little Extra" Hamper (special treats from our region including jams, chocolates, tapenade and much much more)
  • 1 x bottle of Jack Rabbit Sparkling
  • 4 x 60 minute relaxation massages in our day spa
  • Return transfers to a venue of choice (within 3225 postcode area during your stay)
  • Unlimited DVD Hire
  • 12 noon check-out

This offer is valid until the 20th December 2014; No further discounts apply; Some exclusion periods to apply; Package is subject to availability at the time of booking.